Five Cocktails for a party!

I love cocktail parties. Especially ones that give me the opportunity to take my guest’s palates to another level.    This little cocktail party served notice that great mixed drinks don’t have Fireball or Tito’s in them.  Far from.  They take great parts and incredible craft spirits and bring these liquid driven adventures truly to a higher place.

I was given a bottle of Martinique Blue Cane Rhum Agricole recently and I couldn’t think of a nicer way to serve it than with Royal Rose- Simple Syrup of Cardamom and Clove and a bit of seltzer water.

Just over on Mt. Pelee’

Ingredients:

  • 3 oz. Clement Bleue Canne Rhum Agricole (100 Proof)
  • 1 oz. Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Cardamom and Clove
  • 2 oz. Seltzer
  • 2-5 drops Lemon Bitters (of your choice)

Prep:

To a cocktail mixing glass filled ¾ with ice

  • Add the Rhum Agricole
  • Add the Simple Syrup
  • Stir well to combine
  • Pour into a Collins Glass with ice
  • Top with the Seltzer
  • Dribble the bitters over the top and serve

The second cocktail took a simple drink known as the gin and tonic and quite literally, raised the bar with thirty different types of gin.  The crowd favorite?  A little gin in a gorgeous bottle from Scotland named Caorunn.  For some reason (well known to those of us who love artisanal gin) the Caorunn has a richer texture and ‘ginny’ character that worked so well with the multitude of tonic waters that I brought with me.  Amongst the gins were The Botanist, SW4, No.3., Martin Miller’s Pot Still, Hat Trick, FEW, Nolet, Beefeater, and many others.


 Not Just Another Gin and Tonic

Ingredients:

  • 3 oz. Gin of your choice (Caorunn was the crowd favorite)
  • Lemon Zest (no pith!)
  • 5 oz. Cane Sugar Tonic Water- the crowd favorite was Fever Tree Elderflower Tonic (Bed, Bath and Beyond)
  • Aromatic Bitters – like Angostura, often used in a “pink gin”

Prep:

  • Flavor the glass with the lemon zest then the Angostura Bitters
  • Add ice
  • Add the Gin
  • Top with the Tonic
  • Stir and Serve

I’m sure that the third drink is where you want to get going- and that would mean immediately!

The Soda and Cocktail Syrup named Fruitations is where this drink really takes off.  I used the brilliant Tangerine syrup and combined it with Mezcal and then finished it off with a Cane Sugar Ginger Beer from Australia named Bundaberg.  Brilliant stuff.  A wedge of fresh lime and lemon bitters sent this drink further than it has ever been prior.  Trust me.

Just up Near Mexico City

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Mezcal of your choice
  • Orange Zest
  • 1 oz. Fruitations Soda and Cocktail Syrup (Tangerine)
  • Splash Ginger Beer
  • Aromatic or Lemon Bitters

 

Prep:

  • Moisten the inside of a rocks glass with the orange zest
  • Add ice
  • Let cool
  • In a Boston Shaker add:
  • The Fruitations Syrup
  • The Mezcal
  • Cap and Shake hard to combine
  • Double Strain over the ice filled rocks glass
  • Splash of Ginger Beer
  • Dot with Lemon Bitters
  • Spray the lime wedge over the top
  • Serve with a smile

The next drink was my own take on the classic Old Fashioned, and it departs from the classic in one very determined way.  I chose to roast several different kinds of oranges in a bath of both Balsamic vinegar and Demerara sugar until caramelized and bubby- about 2.5 hours at 350 degrees covered.  The final ½ hour is uncovered to add a bit of darkness to the softly cooked fruits.  I then roasted some Luxardo cherries until warmed through and quite soft- about 30 minutes at 350 degrees.  Set to cool so you won’t break your expensive crystal with sizzling hot fruit, pricy whiskey and ice!

 

Not your typical Old Fashioned

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons or so of the oven roasted citrus and cherries
  • 2 oz. Barrell Bourbon Whiskey- I used unreleased batch #012
  • bitters of your choice

Prep:

  • Muddle the roasted fruit
  • Add the whiskey
  • Stir gently
  • Dot with bitters
  • Serve

The final drink was the easiest to duplicate because once you are able to buy a good quality Absinthe, you’ll be more than ½ way there.  Any of the fine Absinthes made by Jade would work beautifully, as would the Lucid line.  There is one thing that I must stress.  The lack of color is far preferable to the ones with color added.  It’s just my preference.

 Just a Normal Louche

Ingredients:

  • Jade Absinthe
  • Drizzle of iced water
  • Great Conversation

Prep:

Release the chilled water from your Absinthe fountain slowly and gently into 2 oz. of Absinthe, sip and repeat until sated

Why Cannabis Cocktails Get A Bad Rap When They Are So Wonderful

And a gorgeous recipe for a Louis Armstrong’s Way cannabis fizzy.

I’ve made my living for the better part of seven years in the liquor space. With that said, I’ve noticed some real changes in that traditional world of intoxicants over the past year or so. After being tolerated for a few years, the large liquor companies are having serious misgivings about being too friendly with the cannabis family. Perhaps this is because the ongoing stigma that hovers just over the periphery in every illicit transaction outside of the “three tier system.” You see, the liquor industry has been permitted to print their own tickets since Prohibition, under the watchful gaze of the government. Taxation is a powerful determinate with broad reaching implications.

Read More athttps://thefreshtoast.com/drink/why-cannabis-cocktails-get-a-bad-rap-when-they-are-so-wonderful/

Louis Armstrong’s Way Fizzy

(makes 2 drinks and a bit more)

4 oz. Clement Rhum Agricole “Canne Bleue”
½ oz. Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
1 oz. Freshly Squeezed Orange Juice
1 oz. Fruitations Soda and Cocktail Syrup- Tangerine
½ lime cut into chunks
4 oz. Ginger Beer Soda (sugar cane based, never corn syrup based)
Angostura
To a Boston Shaker: Fill ¾ with ice. Add the Rhum Agricole and the Fresh juices. Add the Fruitations Syrup. Cap and shake hard until frosty. Muddle the lime in a rocks glass or two. Add a couple cubes of ice. Pour over the contents of the Boston Shaker. Finish with about 2 oz. of the Ginger Beer Soda over the top of each glass. Stir. Dot with Angostura. Serve.

Drink Maple

Drink Maple -- Pure Maple Water -- and Barrell Bourbon Whiskey

When I drink the finest whiskies in the world in a crystal glass, I want to control all the things that I can do something about.
I want to first make sure that my glass is clean and free of any scents or chemicals from my dishwasher.  It’s always my intention to hand-wash my tasting glasses, but even then the way to wash them is to use no soap, which often leaves a film and an off-putting taste.
Yet not washing them with soap is problematic at best.  So, what to do?  The first thing that I do is buy a gallon of white vinegar.  I soak my glassware in a 40/60 wash (vinegar to cool water) overnight in a non-reactive bowl made of glass or, better yet, a food safe bucket.  Any smells or flavors are neutralized by the low PH and high acidity of the white vinegar.  Then instead of throwing out the washing solution, I’ll add it to a bucket and disinfect my mop heads.  It’s pretty amazing stuff.  Got fruit flies in your kitchen?  Put out a dish of white vinegar, cover with plastic wrap and put a couple holes in it and say hello to a 1 way swimming lesson!
 When it’s my turn to test new liquors or combinations of liquor and water, I want a perfectly clear glass without any residue of soap or a smear of lipstick, or the worst offender, garlic pasta.
Barrell Bourbon Whiskey is exactly what I want in my tasting glass, but the only downside is the fact that it’s just after 11:30 in the morning.  I want to taste the sprits but I don’t want to get plastered on the 120 plus proof spirits at this tender hour of the day!  So, what to do?
A couple years ago, I stumbled upon a somewhat new product at the International Fancy Food Show in NYC, named Drink Maple and it’s just that.  It’s USDA Certified Organic Maple Water straight from the tree.  But how do they do this?  What, do you crush trees?
The last time I cut down a maple tree it was just after Hurricane Sandy lay waste to the forest up where I used to live in Jockey Hollow.  I was stacking wood and came upon a fallen maple tree.  My chain-saw got stuck several times because of the high liquid content of the wood.  Maple is very hard to burn in a woodstove unless it is perfectly seasoned- and that might take a couple years of sun, freeze, snow, ice, and thaw.
There’s a lot of liquid in there.  I suppose the owners of the Drink Maple company have figured out how to tap this liquid in large enough amounts to make a product like this viable.  When I think of the wood and what caused my chain-saw to lock up, I couldn’t imagine extracting the liquid in a manner that is financially viable and still delicious.
 It’s delicious…subtle, and lush. Truly gorgeous stuff against my tongue and lips. Inside the lovely, curvaceous bottle is something cooling and lithe.  It’s conversational and intellectual without being overt, trite or dare I say, trendy.  Maple Water is not trendy.  It’s been around for longer than you have.
Maple Water has a subtle sweetness, a silky and opulent mouthfeel.  It is thirst quenching and strangely calming.  And when a mere splash is added to a glass of Barrell Bourbon Whiskey, magic truly happens.  I really feel strongly about this:
  • Mouth-feel:  Soft, rich, pure, exotic spices and fresh sea breeze across the lips
  • Scent:  Subtle, sweet yet highly exciting (like real, freshly gathered branch water)
  • Palate:  Creamy and dense, a froth, bursting from the ground- pure and fresh across the tongue, a swirling tornado of lusciousness and pleasure
  • Finish:  Long finish of sweet maple gives way to deeper notes of spice and freshly cut herbs, a tangle of sweetness lingers then extends on and on to the multi-minute completion
USDA Organic and Verified non GMO, and it’s also jam-packed with electrolytes and natural antioxidants.  When added to Barrell Whiskey, the pure maple water becomes greater than just water.  Maple Water is just spectacular when mixed with some of the finest Bourbon Whiskey that money can buy.
 The Cocktail?
Take one ounce of the Barrell Bourbon (or their magnificent whiskey of your choice) and contemplate…gorgeous stuff.  Add a mere splash of the Drink Maple liquid.  And know you have in your perfectly clear glass one of the best things in the world.   And you can buy these in New Jersey, today…right now!
http://www.barrellbourbon.com/
http://www.drinkmaple.com/

Greenish Cocktail Cherries Recipe

I’m a bit of an evangelist when it comes to homemade cocktail cherries. They’re far, far superior to those red things that come in jars.

INGREDIENTS

1 bottle (750 ml) of bourbon whiskey
8 grams of decarbed cannabis
2 pounds (910 g) pitted fresh cherries
HOW TO MAKE A GREENISH COCKTAIL CHERRIES
  1. Infuse the whiskey with the cannabis following the instructions on page 34**.
  2. Place the pitted cherries in a large mason jar, then cover with the infused whiskey.
  3. Store the jar in a cool, dark place, such as a cellar or refrigerator, for 1 month, shaking the jar daily.
  4. Don’t be afraid to store these outside the fridge at cellar temperature: nothing bad will happen if you do.
  5. Use as called for in cocktails and mocktails.

**Recipe credit to Warren Bobrow’s Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics

https://bevvy.co/cocktail/greenish-cocktail-cherries/nuhy

Pot and Cocktails: The Next Frontier With Prop 64?

Gracias Madre
Gracias Madre
Voters in nine states got to make their opinions known on marijuana last November, and they spoke loudly in favor of it. Eight of the nine ballot initiatives to legalize or deregulate pot passed, officially making cannabis legal for medical use in 28 states and legal for recreational use in nine states, including in our own capitol.

This was far from the first time issues on weed have appeared on ballots, but voters managed to pass a symbolic milestone in 2017. California passed Proposition 64, legalizing the ability for individuals over 21 to use (and grow) marijuana for personal use. Recreational marijuana is now allowed for about 20 percent of the U.S. population, and about three-fifths—nearly 200 million people—have access to legal medical marijuana.

Despite still being banned on a federal level, marijuana is on an inevitable march toward wider societal acceptance and availability via edibles and other weed-based products. And who better to talk to about its growing acceptance than with bartenders, the people who specialize in coming up with clever ways to utilize a different illicit, psychoactive substance? We first covered the question of “where are all of the weed cocktails?” in April of last year, and now that recreational use of pot is inevitable, we’re back to wondering where the two substances together are heading.

So what is exactly happening, if anything at all?


The first crucial thing to note about combining marijuana and alcohol is that not unsurprisingly, it’s very illegal to do so commercially. This includes even in states where both substances are legal separately. In Oregon, weed has been fully legalized for a year and a half, but you still absolutely may not consume it in a public place, especially if that place holds a liquor license. “It’s a huge no-no,” says Chris Churilla, lead bartender at popular Portland cocktail joint Bit House Saloon. “We as a bar take a very aggressive stance toward smoking pot anywhere on the premises. I have physically removed people from the premises and threatened to call the police. If I lose my license or furthermore am imprisoned…that is a risk I will never take, nor will I allow someone else to compromise.”

Even those who advocate mixing weed and drinks acknowledge the need to be careful. Warren Bobrow, the longtime drinks writer behind Cannabis Cocktails, perhaps the world’s first book on the topic, advocates what he calls the Thai food principle: “The first time you take someone out for Thai food, you don’t order the five-star spicy dish. You start small and work your way up” he says. “Any idiot can get everyone wasted, but I don’t recommend that.”

That’s the same advice Ry Prichard provides as well. A Denver-based writer, photographer and “cannabusiness” consultant, Prichard has been working in the legal-marijuana industry since 2010 and serves as co-host and resident weed expert for Bong Appetit, a new show on cannabis food and drinks that premiered last month on Viceland. He’s seen folks overdo it, especially if they’ve already been drinking before they consume any marijuana.

The truth is that, like combining any two drugs, mixing alcohol and marijuana can have a synergistic effect and hit drinkers harder than either substance would by itself. But because this is such a new field (and because federal law limits much research on cannabis), there’s not the same level of understanding of how weed affects the body like you have with alcohol. “There’s not an easy answer. It’s just a body chemistry thing,” Prichard says. “There’s not a good test of how impaired someone is by cannabis, and it’s gonna be a big mess trying to figure this out.”


Beyond the legal issues and the Wild West feel of the whole field, a cannabis cocktail culture is starting to come together. And one of the pioneers is Jason Eisner, beverage director for a restaurant group that operates several vegan restaurants in California, including Gracias Madre in Los Angeles. Gracias Madre’s menu includes a trio of cocktails that incorporate cannabidol (CBD), the chemical component of marijuana responsible for many of its anti-anxiety and anti-inflammatory effects, which might make him the first American bartender to ever sell a cannabis cocktail in a licensed bar. “I found a loophole,” Eisner says. He’s currently using a CBD extract called CW Hemp that’s made from hemp—basically the stems but not the flowers and leaves of the cannabis plant—and is perfectly legal in all 5o states. No, really: There are many brands available on Amazon.

Eisner’s been a bartender since the late ‘90s, working everywhere from New York to Malibu, and he launched his CBD cocktails about seven months ago. He tried pot as a teenager, but didn’t really like it until a few years ago when he tried some medical-grade stuff a friend had smuggled in from California. Since then, he’s become an evangelist for pot’s beneficial effects. “With CBD, I still have my wits about me. I can go about my day,” he says. “I started putting it in cocktails because I wanted other people like me to get it too. The people hanging blacklight Cypress Hill posters in their bedrooms don’t need me to introduce them to cannabis.”

The truth is that, like combining any two drugs, mixing alcohol and marijuana can have a synergistic effect and hit drinkers harder than either substance would by itself.

But it’s not just non-psychoactive CBD that’s the subject of drinks experiments. Plenty of folks are also incorporating THC, the chemical in weed that actually gets you high. “Cannabis and alcohol went into everything back in the apothecary days,” Bobrow says. In a previous book, Apothecary Cocktails, he featured recipes for old-timey medicinal tinctures, bitters and cocktails calling for a variety of botanical ingredients, but his publisher wouldn’t let him include marijuana—that was part of the impetus for Cannabis Cocktails. Bobrow likes to take advantage of the savory and citrusy notes pot can bring to drinks, especially those on the more savory side of the spectrum.

Different strains of weed can contribute different flavors: Bobrow says indicas have a “dank, dark” flavor that goes will with brown spirits, while sativas tend to be “light, aromatic and crisp” and go well with lighter-bodied spirits like gin, tequila or mezcal. (Eisner agrees, saying his favorite spirit with CBD oil are agave spirits, which he says also improve mood: “You can’t be sad drinking a Margarita.”)

“In my personal experience, I really like the mix of marijuana and alcohol—not just the physical effects but also the flavor,” Prichard says. “Cannabis by its nature plays toward aromas that pair well with food and drinks.” He’s a fan of using terpenes to incorporate marijuana flavors in drinks without psychoactive effects. Terpenes are aromatic compounds found in a wide range of fruits, flowers and plants, including in high quantities in marijuana. Several companies sell bottled terpenes extracted from different strains of cannabis—basically essential oils—and Prichard frequently uses them on Bong Appetit. (One of his favorites comes from a strain called Lemon Haze, which has a sweet and tangy note he says works well in tiki drinks.) In theory, the terpenes do not have any physical or psychoactive effect on the human body, but on the other hand, Prichard says, “the whole field of aromatherapy is predicated on the idea that these kinds of chemicals can heal.”

Terpenes helped convert Devon Tarby to the marijuana-cocktail cause as well. A bartender in Southern California for nearly a decade, she’s now a partner in and in charge of menu development for Proprietors LLC, which runs several of the country’s top bars, including Death & Co. in New York and The Walker Inn in L.A. She’s also a self-described “mostly daily” cannabis user, but she’d never combined marijuana and alcohol until she got a call from Bong Appetit’s producers to help create cocktails for a video. “The coolest thing was being introduced to terpenes,” she says. “As soon as I figure out where to get them, I want to have them on hand at my bars.” On the show, she created an aperitif cocktail using the bitter gentian liqueur Suze, floral St-Germain and sparkling wine with an oil extracted from a pot strain that smells of fresh pine and lemon.


So where is this all headed? As a society, we’ve had centuries to build up all the rituals and norms associated with drinking in bars, but there’s really no equivalent for marijuana. “In just a few years, we’ve gone from Cheech & Chong to cancer patients or a stressed-out mom with a vape pen,” Prichard says. “But it’s still gonna be a while, if ever, until you can have a beer and smoke a joint at the same bar.”

He cites Initiative 300, passed by voters in the city of Denver in November, which establishes licenses that allow public consumption of cannabis in places like coffee shops, yoga studios and cafes—but, thanks to adjustments to the law quickly adopted by the city, absolutely not anywhere with a liquor license. “We may see the first legal cannabis clubs in America in the next six months,” he says. In the future, Prichard envisions “places separate from the bar scene but with a similar feel to a bar.”

As a society, we’ve had centuries to build up all the rituals and norms associated with drinking in bars, but there’s really no equivalent for marijuana.

If that sounds similar to the “coffee shops” that sell marijuana in Amsterdam, you’re not wrong. That’s the model Tarby thinks will develop in America as well, but she worries the fledgling industry is on unsteady ground. “Everyone is still just scratching the surface,” she says. “The last thing anybody wants is to have people who don’t know how to properly serve cannabis and ruin it for everybody.”

Eisner, for his part, is totally on board with the marijuana revolution. He’s working on a non-alcoholic canned “cocktail” made with CBD called Dope Cannabis Cocktails that he hopes to have on sale by the end of the year, as well as a cannabis cafe concept modeled on Amsterdam coffee houses in California. “This is just the beginning. We’ll even see full-on cannabis restaurants,” he says. “The next generation has made their voices heard on this issue. The federal government won’t be able to continue suppressing cannabis for very long.”

For now, most experiments in combining pot and cocktails remain hidden underground, but we’re witnessing the birth of something brand-new that’s going to change the way we get our mind-altering chemicals. “It’s already a multi-billion-dollar business,” Prichard says. “And it’s definitely not going away.”

http://www.playboy.com/articles/recreational-weed-pot-and-cocktails

The Best Recipes With Blueberry Strain –

tomato juice with shrimp and cherry tomato

Warren Bobrow is a famous marijuana enthusiast and mixologist. These are the two passions of his life, and their mix can only result in something wonderful. His favorite art of spirited drinks is now shown in a cocktail book that contains dozens of recipes. These marijuana-infused drinks impress the audience with their diversity and delicious taste.

His book Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics also contains useful information about the history of the pharmacists of the old times using cannabis-infused tinctures and drinks to treat their patients. In addition, the introduction of the book describes various ways of infusing alcohol, preparing tonics and tinctures to use them in the future for the delicious recipes in the book.

At first, Warren Bobrow creates a large variety of tinctures, oils, milk, and syrups that allow the mixologist to bring the art of cocktail-making to the new levels. For a long time, the man has been trying to find the ideal balance between alcohol and weed.

If you have ever wanted to make a cannabis-infused cocktail, add THC to your Bloody Mary, you simply have to read this book for some knowledge and inspiration.

If you wonder what cannabis strain to use for these drinks, we can recommend you to experiment a little and try to use the Blueberry strain. As all indica-dominant hybrid strains, this one will provide you with the necessary relaxation and happiness. This strain adds both sweetness and exotic notes to your marijuana beverage.
A Bloody Good Remedy
Ingredients:

180 ml chilled tomato-clam mixer (such as Clamato)
10 ml (2 teaspoons) of cannabis tincture
garnishes (the usual variants include olives, fresh chiles, celery sticks, etc.)
Have you ever tried the famous Bloody Mary before? If it is your favorite drink, we recommend you to read another recipe of Mr. Bobrow that adds a bit of spice to this drink. A Bloody Good Remedy has one special quality that will surprise you—the drink has no alcohol in it. Besides, it is just lightly medicated, so you do not have to worry about overwhelming effects.

You simply have to fill a glass with a lot of ice, pour the tomato-clam mixture into the glass, and add some tincture that you have at home. This recipe allows you to experiment with garnishes—be as creative as you like. Besides, you can add a few blueberries or grapes as a garnish instead of using a berry-flavoured tincture. The combination may seem strange at first, but it is something new for you to try.

All drinks in this book are elegant and full of nuances that can help you understand the mixology a little better. Besides, each one of them, from the simple coffee to complex alcohol drinks, has its own author notes that are full of useful information and present the drink in an ideal way.

– See more at: http://drinkwire.liquor.com/post/warren-bobrows-mixology-workshop-the-best-recipes-with-blueberry-strain#gs.=uQeCPY – Read more at: http://scl.io/ySb1lwlf#gs.=uQeCPY

Woodstock!

Authors talk butter, cannabis cocktails in Woodstock

This week the Golden Notebook bookstore, 29 Tinker Street, Woodstock, brings us two gastro-literary events.

The first, at 4 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at the bookstore features Award-winning food writer and chef Elaine Khosrova reading from and discussing her book “Butter: A Rich History.” From the ancient butter bogs of Ireland to the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Butter is about so much more than food, she tells us. She includes the essential collection of carefully developed core butter recipes, from beurre manie and croissants to pate brisee and the perfect buttercream frosting, and provides practical how-tos for making various types of butter at home — no churning necessary.

Then, in what may be a perfect complement to the Butter event, Warren Bobrow brings us Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics, this one at 6 p.m. Saturday, December 3 at the Golden Notebook.

Bobrow is the creator of the blog cocktailwhisperer.com, and he’ll teach you how to create your own cannabis infused cocktails. He insists that combining cannabis and cocktails is a hot new trend and he’ll show you the essential instructions for de-carbing cannabis to release its full psychoactive effect. He’ll urge you to ‘look beyond cocktails and create successful tonics, syrups, shrubs, bitters, compound butter and exotic infused oil to use in any drink. Start your day with coffee, tea, and milk-based cannabis beverages for healing and relaxation. Get your afternoon pick-me-up with gut healing shrubs and mood enhancing syrups.’ Bobrow is the author of Apothecary Cocktails, Whiskey Cocktails and Bitters and Shrub Syrup Cocktails. He has taught classes on spirits and cocktails all over the world, including an advanced class on rum at the Moscow Bar Show.

For more information, call 845-679-8000 or see www.goldennotebook.com.

 

http://hudsonvalleyone.com/2016/12/01/authors-talk-butter-cannabis-cocktails-in-woodstock/