Underneath Bell’s Crossing

Underneath Bell's CrossingI was playing around with flavors the other day and coffee seemed to resonate more clearly than ever.  Maybe it was the recent cold snap, or perhaps it was my palate calling out for deeper, read- more intense flavors.  That’s where Death Wish Coffee comes into play.  They say that it’s the world’s strongest coffee and I tend to agree with them- as long as I control the brewing method.  You see, I’m pretty picky when it comes to strong.  I like to do coffee in either a French Press or as a pour-over.  Never do I use an automatic machine.

It’s pretty hard to mess up coffee when it is well roasted and Death Wish seems to have their roasting expertise down to a minute science.

Instead of the pricey Arabica beans, they have chosen the rougher- and more caffeinated Robusta beans.  OK, before you get your underwear all in a bunch, it just happens to be that Robusta coffee is excellent in craft cocktails.  Especially when they are treated to a long, cold infusion.

For this is why I do what I do.  I love to play around with flavors and Death Wish Coffee makes it easy on me.

I’m pretty well known for simplicity in my craft cocktails.  This one is no different with only three ingredients plus bitters.  That should satisfy even the most hard pressed for time bartender/mixologist.  Because if you are ten deep at the bar on any given Saturday night, let me tell you from my own experience that fewer ingredients make a happier bartender!

This cocktail, a take on the classic Manhattan involves a rum that is near and dear to my heart.  I use Mezan XO because of the anything but sweet- funky, slightly smoky (bourbon oak cask aged) demeanor.  The XO is a combination of rums from four different Jamaican distilleries.  The part of the story that speaks most clearly to me involves the rum from Long Pond.  Its distinctive flavor stands out as authentic, untouched rum.  No caramel, no added sugar, no glycerin, no chill-filtering.  Ah, the good stuff.

So I took a healthy portion of the Jamaica XO and added it to a 24-hour infusion of the Death Wish Coffee (It’s usually called cold brewed- I call it slightly insane) and added to a bit of my favorite for a Manhattan of this demeanor, Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth.  There is a smoky unctuous quality about Carpano.  Perhaps it is the historic recipes that dates back to the 1700’s.  I’m not sure- but they did say that Vermouth was originally invented against head lice and stomach worms so it couldn’t hurt you if you use it with rum and coffee.

Underneath Bell’s Crossing

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Mezan XO Rum
  • 2 oz. Cold Brewed Death Wish Coffee
  • 2 oz. Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth
  • 1 cocktail cherry – better be home cured
  • 3-5 shakes Chocolate Mole’ Bitters

Prep:

  • Pre-chill double old fashioned glass with ice and water
  • To a cocktail mixing glass filled ¼ with ice
  • Add the Mezan XO Rum
  • Add the Death Wish Coffee- cold brewed
  • Add the Carpano Antica
  • Add the Chocolate Mole’ Bitters
  • Stir 30-40 times
  • Taste with a straw discretely!
  • Adjust seasoning adding more bitters as necessary
  • Strain into pre-chilled glass
  • Add cherry
  • Serve!

Soothe The Sorrow: 5 Post-Election Cocktails You Need Right Now

http://thefreshtoast.com/drink/5-post-election-cocktails-need-right-now/

Photo via Unsplash Jens Theeß

Photo via Unsplash Jens Theeß

You see, although Mr. Trump’s New Jersey electorate lost to the Democrats, the resentment towards the overall losing party has never been so clear. Through winning, there is loss. Through loss, there is winning. Perhaps this will act as a metaphor for the next election. Today, I’m voting for cocktails …the Cocktail Party!

If you’d like to join me, here are a few of my favorite post-election cocktails, most of which are infused with cannabis*, the big winner of this year’s election. We can all drink to that!

 The World is Bewildered

Need help sleeping tonight? Try this Manhattan-style cocktail.

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz. cold brew coffee
  • 1 oz. Panamanian rum
  • 1 oz. Carpano Antica sweet vermouth or Dolin for a drier approach
  • orange zest — cut with a knife, never a peeler — pinched and flamed over the top
  • Regan’s bitters infused with THC
  • Luxardo Cherry
  • either a coupe or a rocks glass

To a cocktail mixing glass: Add one or two large cubes of ice. Add the cold brew. Add the Panamanian rum. Add the Carpano Antica. Stir. Season with Regan’s orange bitters, THC infused (note: I used ¼ oz. high grade cannabis- infused for 1 month in a bottle of Regan’s, strained). Taste. Strain into a coupe or rocks glass (if you use a rocks glass, only one or two cubes maximum!). Pinch and flame the orange zest, rub on the rim of the glass and serve.

Welcome to the Visigoths

The last few weeks have been filled with Twitter Flame Wars. It’s your turn to win one (more). This sleepy-tidrink makes light of the rise of the Anti-intellectuals. We know who you are!   

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Mezan XO rum
  • ½ oz. Stroh 160 rum 80% alcohol
  • 4 oz. cane sugar cola
  • ¼ oz. orange liqueur

To a Collins glass filled ¾ with ice: Add the orange liqueur. Top with the Mezan XO. Cover with the cane sugar cola. Float the Stroh 160 on top; ignite with a match. Add a colorful straw. Serve!

 A Long Steep Hill

A cocktail to bewilder the palates of your neo-conservative neighbors.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. bourbon whiskey infused with THC to your strength and taste
  • ¼ oz. ginger syrup
  • 1 oz. Fruitations tangerine
  • 3 oz. lemon flavored seltzer water
  • 4-5 shakes aromatic bitters

To a cocktail shaker filled ¾ with ice: Add the cannabis-infused bourbon whiskey. Add the ginger syrup. Add the Fruitations syrup. Cap and shake hard. Pour over ice in a double Old Fashioned glass. Splash seltzer water over the top. Dot with bitters.

The MacGregories

A cocktail to give you hope and dream of change. A take on the gin and juice of yore… and infused with pure THC for your dreams.   

Ingredients:

  • 3 oz. THC infused Barr Hill gin (the amount and strength of the THC is up to you. I used 14 grams of 25% THC cannabis in a 750ml bottle of raw honey and grain gin)
  • 2 oz. freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 2 oz. freshly squeezed grapefruit juice
  • 2 oz. freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 oz. Fruitations cranberry
  • 3-4 shakes Angostura bitters

To a Boston Shaker filled ¾ with ice: Add the THC-infused gin and the juices with the cranberry syrup. Cap and shake hard for 20 seconds. Pour into a pair of coupes. Dot with bitters. Serve.

AKA: Political Discourse Fails…Yet Again

So you want to win an argument?  

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Luxardo maraschino liqueur
  • 1 oz. bourbon whiskey (like Barrell Bourbon) infused with THC of your choice and strength
  • ¼ oz. dry vermouth
  • 1 oz. freshly squeezed grapefruit juice
  • 1 oz. rich simple syrup
  • aromatic bitters

Add all the ingredients to a Boston Shaker. Cap and shake hard for 20 seconds or so. Pour into a double Old Fashioned glass with one large cube of ice. Dot with bitters. Serve.

*Infusions

To make a cannabis infusion, add 7 grams — or the dosage recommended by your caregiver—of ground, decarbed cannabis to 250 ml (about 1 cup) of a liquor of your choice in a heat-proof mason jar. Do not seal the jar, it could burst. Place the jar in the top of a double boiler on a hot plate or electric stove top.

(Never, ever use a gas stove or an open flame.) Fill the top of the double boiler with enough water to cover the mason jar halfway.

Simmer lightly at around 160ºF (71°C) for 30 to 60 minutes. Use a digital thermometer to keep an eye on the temperature. Alcohol flames just over 170ºF (77°C), so pay close attention to the job at hand, and don’t go running out for a pizza. Plus, a low heat will keep evaporation to a minimum.

Let the mixture cool, strain it through a fine-mesh strainer lined with cheesecloth, then funnel it back into the empty liquor bottle. Top up the bottle with the remaining un-infused liquor until it’s back to a volume of 750 ml. This ensures that the THC will be dispersed throughout the infusion. Your infusion is now ready to use in your handcrafted cocktails.

Warren Bobrow, a.k.a. The Cocktail Whisperer, is the author of four books, including his latest: Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics.

– See more at: http://thefreshtoast.com/drink/5-post-election-cocktails-need-right-now/#sthash.krGzDYBm.dpuf

Craft Cocktail Compendium!!

My latest book, Craft Cocktail Compendium !!

Muddle, mix, shake, stir, pour–whatever the method, you’ll learn how to create the perfect cocktail.

Whether you’re new to mixing drinks or have been creating your own cocktails for years, The Craft Cocktail Compendium has everything you need to know to mix, shake, or stir your way to a delicious drink. With over 200 craft cocktail recipes, expert mixologist Warren Bobrow will help you broaden your skills and excite your taste buds with unique takes on timeless favorites and recipes you’ve likely never tried before.240x4009781592337620

https://www.quartoknows.com/books/9781592337620/The-Craft-Cocktail-Compendium.html

Total Food Service Interview; I’m honored!

Warren Bobrow, better known as The Cocktail Whisperer, is the published author of four books in addition to his contributions as a writer to liquor.com, our own totalfood.com and countless others. He has also taught at the New School in New York City and at Stonewall Kitchen in Maine. His latest book is Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics that was released this past June through Fair Winds Press. Much more than just a collection of cocktail recipes, Warren’s new book explores the history of cannabis use in drinks, the over-politicized arguments over its legality and other pertinent topics.

Could you expand on your background and how you got to this point?

I am mostly a self-trained chef, I went to Johnson and Wales for a short time as well as the ACF apprenticeship program. I was working in the television business but that was not working. I went to work as a pot scrubber in restaurant and that set me on the path to become a chef. I am now an ACF-certified Chef and I love to cook. It is catharsis for me.

What were you doing before the Cocktail Whisperer blog and brand took off?

I was working as a chef in Charleston when I lost my business to Hurricane Hugo. Then I moved back to my home state in New Jersey and worked as a bank teller and in private bank for a long time. Then I started Cocktail Whisperer.

What inspired you to write this book?

Ever since I was a young man I have enjoyed the use of cannabis. I have seen cannabis cookbooks released and I wanted to raise the bar by taking cannabis and infusing it with the cocktail business that I am in. I love cocktails and I love cannabis. They are two things that I think “play well together in the sandbox”.

Is it difficult to get people past the stigma that cannabis is bad for you  or somehow wrong?

It is really tough, especially where I am. I grew up in Morristown, New Jersey which is a very conservative place. The mindset is not pro-cannabis. It is arrest, incarcerate and throw away the key. And it is unfortunate because there are valid health benefits to this much maligned plant. Drugs are not bad and people should keep an open mind. Especially those who drink or smoke cigarettes.

What was the process of researching for this book?

The research was done outside of the state of New Jersey, where cannabis is still illegal. I am used to experimenting with culinary ingredients and different flavors so I applied that same mentality to the book. Nothing had ever really been written about it before. I was in new territory. I was careful, my advice to anyone would be to experiment in a place where it is legal and just be careful and responsible.

Could you talk about the other elements of the book other than recipes?

I am constantly trying to destigmatize the use of cannabis. I give a robust history in the beginning with science and humor. This book is for anyone interested in cannabis or anyone who is unsure of how to use it. The introduction was written by Jerry Whiting. Him and I found each other quite organically. He is well extremely well-respected in the healing field which gives the text a lot of credibility from that end.

What advice would you offer people buying the book who will be making these cocktails?

Put it in the hands of your “budtender” to give you knowledge and fill your individual need. Remember that making cannabis cocktails is completely different from smoking cannabis. I give the cure to drinking a bit too much of a cannabis cocktail in the book.

Cannabis_Cocktails_Mezzrole
One of Warren’s creations. c/o Fair Winds Press, an imprint of Quarto Publishing Group

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My thoughts are follow the Thai food principle. You can always make something more spicy but you cannot make it less spicy. Start small and build up from there. Remember also that no one has ever died from a cannabis overdose but too much will make you feel awful.

How do you respond to critics who say you’re messing around and that this is your opinion, not fact?

It is fact. I researched this and studied the health and holistic healing benefits, both of which are immense. This book is not a recreational book and was not written as one. It is a way for people to discover new ways to enjoy themselves and to discover some new methods for holistic healing.

Was this an easy book to pitch to your publisher?

Of all the books I have pitched this was the easiest sell. I came up with the idea to write the book at a food show in New York City and when I told my publisher I wanted to write it they asked for a proposal to put in front of the board. The rest is history, they loved the idea since its was going to be the first book of its kind.

How has the response been to the book so far?

Writing this was not an easy thing to do. Many people have purchased the book and love it, however it has brought a certain amount of controversy into my life and anxiety that I did not necessarily want or need. But there is nothing I can do about it, I am just moving forward and surrounding myself with positive people who understand what I am trying to do. Most people love the book and the response has been terrific.

Did you consider that controversy when you were writing the text and did it give you any pause?

I didn’t have any other ideas! It was all I could think of so no, it never crossed my mind. I just saw it as an opportunity to do something unique and interesting.

Cannabis Cocktails offers THC infused recipes for imbibers!

dish-spirits-July28Warren Bobrow is a brand ambassador, former bank executive and the author of four cocktail books. His latest is Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations.

And if there were any doubts as to the possible commercial success of a book on cannabis drinks—I’m in New Orleans this week—and it’s totally sold out.

One caveat Bobrow offers is that he cannot tell people the correct doses for the different strains or the risks inherent in using cannabis tinctures. He offers up the Thai food spice principal: Start low, as “you can always add more spice.” He suggests waiting an hour between drinks.

VUE spoke with the author about his training, his book, and reinventing himself at 50-years-old.

VUE WEEKLY: How did you get your start with cocktails?

WARREN BOBROW: I trained as a chef in the ’80s. I started in television, that didn’t work out so well. I always wanted to work in a kitchen so I got a job as a pot-scrubber. I worked my way up the line as an apprentice to become a saucier. Cocktails came easy to me after being trained in flavours.

VW: When did you know you wanted to write cocktail books?

WB: That came about after a Ministry of Rum event in 2010. The founder, Ed Hamilton, encouraged me into it. I left corporate banking in 2009, and there was a short window before I met Hamilton. I took classes with celebrated writers and instructors Andy Smith, at The New School, and with Alan Richman, at the International Culinary Center of New York. The writing came easy to me. There is good writing out there, but I truly felt I could do better. I was going to write about food and wine. I didn’t look at cocktails until I talked to Ed Hamilton.

The only ingredient missing from my last book Apothecary Cocktails: Restorative Drinks from Yesterday and Today was cannabis. Cannabis is a very dicey subject. I didn’t want to make the book a ‘get-high quick guide’.

VW: What’s been the hardest part of this journey?

WB: I’m 55 now and I didn’t know what I was going to do with my life until I was 50. I was 48 when I lost my banking job and I worked for two years without a pay cheque. When I left they gave me severance and I used that to reinvent myself. This has not been easy, financially.

VW: What’s your favourite cocktail to make from the Cannabis Cocktails book?

WB: It’s a well-made Absinthe Frappé. Good luck getting one in most places. The absinthe is usually terrible, the ice is even worse. I love to use Cuvée Edouard absinthe, and got permission to use it in the book. I infuse it with THC. I also love a Sazerac with the THC infused absinthe. 

http://www.vueweekly.com/cannabis-cocktails-offers-thc-infused-recipes-for-imbibers/

Cherry Popper!!

Capture“I’ve found that the deep cherry notes of both Luxardo and Heering are a great complement and substitute for almond, allspice and passion fruit syrups.” Warren Bobrow, author of books such as Apothecary Cocktails: Restorative Drinks from Yesterday and Today, also points to the sweet nature of tiki cocktails as working in cherry liqueur’s favour. “I’m from the mindset of dry, and sometimes over proof rum over sweet, caramel coloured and heavily sugared rum in a tiki drink,” he says. “It’s the sweet stuff that is so memorable the next morning.” So he layers cherry flavours at the bottom of the glass and serves it with a straw for guests to “pull the sweet liqueur up from the bottom through the drier elements of the rum”.

44.DRINKS.NEED TO KNOW.(HL)