From Prevention Magazine

I was asked to provide some “healthy” cocktails for Prevention Magazine… Here they are:

Recipes for the healthy tippler

By Mandy Oaklander

Photo credit: Mandy Oaklander

Surprised We’re Not In Reno

Warren Bobrow’s smoky twist on the vodka cola uses natural ingredients. No high fructose corn syrup in sight! “It’s healing and potent,” Bobrow says. “Root dates back to country medicinal curatives.”

Serves 1-2

2 shots vodka (we used Ketel One)
1 shot Root (an organic elixir with birch bark, black tea, spices—similar to sarsaparilla)
1/2 shot sweet Vermouth
Natural cola (we used all-natural Q Drinks cola)
Orange twist

ADD the liquors to your cocktail shaker
SHAKE and top with a splash of cola. Garnish with orange twist.

Read more: http://www.prevention.com/food/cook/healthy-drink-recipes-cocktails/surprised-were-not-reno#ixzz2GXcddM3J

Photo credit: Mandy Oaklander

Hot Cranberry, Blueberry, and Gin Thoreau

“I prefer the tiny, intensely flavored Maine wild blueberries for this cocktail; they come either frozen or canned during the off-season,” Bobrow says. We skipped the cranberry sauce and maple syrup to save on calories and sugar—and we still wanted a second mug.

Serves 2, strongly

1/4 cup each of crushed cranberries and blueberries
1/3 cup cranberry sauce
4 shots gin (we used Bulldog London Dry Gin)
1/3 cup water
1 cup cranberry juice
1/4 cup fresh lime juice
Grade B dark amber maple syrup, optional
Several orange slices
2 fresh lemon thyme sprigs

MUDDLE the crushed cranberries with the blueberries to make a slurry, then add the cranberry sauce to the mix

ADD the gin and let sit for a few minutes to combine the flavors

BRING the water to a boil in a small saucepan and add the cranberry and lime juices

ADD the heated cranberry juice mixture to the muddled cranberry mixture and stir together. Pour into 2 preheated mugs (we strained it)

SWEETEN with maple syrup if desired, and garnish with orange slices and a sprig of lemon thyme.

Cooler Weather=Four Roses+Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer (for Foodista)

Cooler Weather=Four Roses+Cock n’Bull Ginger Beer

October 8, 2012

Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer is one of those flavors that just won’t leave my mind.  There are many ginger beers on the market today. Some of them good, some great and some truly amazing.  I’ve found that the Cock ‘n Bull is a spicier ginger beer than most and it has a core of real ginger root.

There has been a resurgence for classic cocktails made with ginger beer, a nostalgic experience.  Perhaps this is because drinkers enjoy the more robust flavors of ginger beer in combination with diverse liquors.  I like mine not only with Rum in the classic ‘Dark ‘n Stormy’ but also the smoky and spicy notes of Bourbon Whiskey mixed with ginger beer.

The Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer has a venerable history that dates back long before many of the current day products were even thought of.

Jack Morgan was the owner of the restaurant in Los Angeles in the 1940’s by the name of the Cock ‘n Bull.  He was the inventor of the historic drink named the Moscow Mule- which is no more than vodka and his namesake extra spicy, ginger beer.

Fast forward to current day.  The Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer is now available in multiple markets around the country.  Cocktailians from all over are discovering the extreme ease when mixing Cockt ‘n Bull with liquors as diverse as dark Rum, Scotch, Cognac, Irish Whiskey, and of course Bourbon!

I love Bourbon Whiskey mixed with Ginger Beer.  Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon is one of my favorite go/to’s for Bourbon that is heading for the cocktail shaker.   The first thing I taste when sipping Four Roses straight is the sweet vanilla enrobed in cayenne pepper, tempered by lightly smoked peaches.  There is definitely stone fruit in every sip of the Small Batch version.

Mixed with the Cock n’ Bull Ginger Beer, the Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon adds dimension and character to every cocktail.  I prefer my Roses and Ginger in a tall glass.  And in keeping with my cocktailian persuits, I like to twist it up a bit.  Keep it fresh and different.

Bitter End Bitters makes one such cocktail augmentation that I feel would just rock in this Bourbon/Ginger Beer cocktail.  It is called the Mexican Mole Bitters.  Laced with hot chilies, bittersweet chocolate and Southwestern herbs, each scant drop adds a hidden element that will fully reveal itself when combined with the other ingredients in the cocktail.

And in keeping with my cocktailian intellect, I’ve frozen these Bitter End Mexican Mole’ Bitters into ice cubes made with water from my Mavea “Inspired Water” Pitcher.  The water is inspired because of a proprietary formula to strip out the harmful elements of ordinary tap water and turn it (inspire) into a crisp, luscious glass of water.

The same holds true for ice.  Ice made with water from my Mavea freezes almost crystal clear!

I’ve been adding different cocktail bitters into my ice.  When the ice melts, the cocktail bitters become melded into the cocktail, augmenting the flavor and deepening it during the melting process.

While some cocktail chefs are experimenting with liquid nitrogen, I’m using a much less expensive method of freezing.  Ice is my method, frozen for a couple of hours in the freezer.

Laced with the Bitter End Bitters- the drink becomes something otherworldly.

And that’s why I make cocktails.  To deepen my customer’s sense of taste.  Each taste is a living laboratory in each sip.

Four Roses Small Batch and Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer

(Tall Drink)

Make ice using Bitter End Mexican Mole’ Bitters (4 drops per cube) with water from a Mavea “Inspired Water” pitcher.

Freeze overnight or until absolutely firm

Add three “inspired water” ice cubes to a tall glass

Add 2 Oz. Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon

Add Cock ‘n Bull Ginger Beer to top

Add a bit of fresh lime juice and a hunk of lime

Scrape some fresh nutmeg over the top (essential!)

Serve to an appreciative customer!

Danger level 3 out of 5..

If you want a stronger drink, then just add more Bourbon!

 

About me:

Warren Bobrow is the Food and Drink Editor of the 501c3 non profit Wild Table on Wild River Review located in Princeton, New Jersey.

He is one of 12 journalists world-wide, and the only one from the USA to participate in the Fête de la Gastronomie– the weekend of September 22nd. 2012 in Burgundy.

He attended Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans in 2011/2012.

Warren presented freestyle mixology at the International Food Bloggers Conference in Portland, Oregon. (2012)

Warren judged the Iron Mixology competition at the Charleston Wine and Food Festival (2012)

Warren has published over four hundred articles on everything from cocktail mixology to restaurant reviews to travel articles- globally.

You may also find him on the web at: http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

Are you a Carnivore? I am.

October 9, 2012
I’ll admit it.  I’m a carnivore.  There is nothing I like more than tucking into a slab of dry-aged PRIME Beef.  My favorite way of cooking dry aged beef is very simple. Let the steak come to room temperature to relax the muscle.  Rub the steak with sea salt and freshly cracked pepper.Grill over hard-wood charcoal, preferably homemade.  Homemade charcoal you say?  Yes.  I make my own from wood that I age and cut by hand.  It’s easy.  If you don’t have access to a few dozen fallen trees you can always buy a bag of “natural” charcoal at your local Whole Foods market.

It’s very important, in fact essential NEVER to buy that charcoal that has lighter fluid cooked into it.  Why?  Because no matter how long you burn the infused charcoal, it will always taste like gasoline.

When I’m paying top dollar from my local German butcher (Hoeffner’s in Morristown, NJ) I want to make sure that my dry-aged beef tastes like beef!

Not like lighter fluid.

Starting a charcoal grill is simple.  I’ve never owned a gas grill and wouldn’t know what to do with one if I did.

A fine choice is the medium sized Weber Kettle Grill.

I can control the heat for cooking by burning the coals on one side of the grill and using the natural convection from the curved lid to “circular” cook whatever I desire.  The heat works wonders and infuses your food is a bath of luscious wood smoke.

You can even add grapevines, cherry or apple wood to the fire to add flavor.

Plus the natural flavor of hard-wood charcoal is far more pleasurable in my opinion than the flavor of gas.  Just my opinion after years of cooking over wood.

Bourbon Distilleries often sell the charcoal that lines the insides of their barrels.  I recently received a bag of Rye Whiskey infused charcoal from a distillery in Pennsylvania named Dad’s Hat.  I placed the Rye Whiskey charcoal just off the heat so that the aromatics of the Whiskey combined with the burning wood, throwing off a Rye laced smoke.  On a rack of beef ribs, the aromatics were most beguiling.  You can duplicate this at home.  There are no secrets here!  Ok, maybe one secret.  When the charred meat comes off the grill, let it rest on a wooden cutting board for about three to five minutes.  Why?  If you cut into it hot off the grill, all the succulent juices will drain out, leaving you with a tough piece of meat.

This is my secret and one that I’m sure Chef Symon will concur with as well.

Imagine my delight when I learned that Michael Symon, the 2009 James Beard Award winning chef was coming to the Short Hills Williams-Sonoma store!

Finally, someone who gets it when teaching the careful preparation of meat!

Yes, he is a carnivore– like myself.  I’m sure we’ll have much in common.  As a former grill-dog in the restaurant business, I can talk charred meat all day long!

Michael Symon, the author of the upcoming book named Carnivore is coming to sign his newest cookbook in our local Williams-Sonoma store.

Anyone who exemplifies the art of cooking meat will be charmed by his eloquent style and abundant passion.

Although Michael will not be doing a cooking demo during this book signing, he will fill the room with his infectious wit.

From what I hear, he disarms even his toughest critics!

I cannot wait to meet him in person and you will too.

 

See you in Short Hills!

Here’s the event information:

Williams-Sonoma Short Hills (Upper Level)

Mall At Short Hills
Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 5:00pm
1200 Morris Turnpike, Short Hills, NJ, 07078
(973) 467-3641

Here’s more information about Michael:
Co-host on The Chew, an Iron Chef and host of Cooking Channel’s Symon Suppers, chef Michael Symon wows even the toughest food critics, while making audiences smile with his contagious laugh.

Carnivore, Symon’s second cookbook, will be out this October and feature recipes crafted for meat-lovers.

http://bit.ly/SO4sdO

I’m hoping if you are in the New York/New Jersey- Metro area, you’ll come out for this introduction to a true Star Chef, Michael Symon.

Here is a simple cocktail that I invented to go with grilled beef.

 

The Brick Pollitt Cocktail  Makes one really tangy/spicy cocktail perfect for aged PRIME Beef

Ingredients:

Dad’s Hat Rye Whiskey

Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Three Chilies

Bitter End Memphis Barbecue Bitters

Perrier Sparkling Natural Mineral Water

Ice made from your Mavea “Inspired Water” Pitcher infused with the Bitter End Memphis BBQ Bitters

Preparation:

One day prior to making your cocktails, freeze a tray of ice using your Mavea Pitcher “Inspired Water” and drop four drops of the Bitter End Memphis BBQ Bitters into each opening of the ice cube tray, freeze overnight

To a Boston Shaker (cocktail shaker) add some regular ice

Add 2 oz. Dad’s Hat Rye Whiskey (or your choice of Rye)

Add 2 Tablespoons Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Three Chilies

Stir well to chill, do not shake this cocktail!

Add a couple of the Bitter End Bitters infused Mavea Water- ice cubes to a short rocks glass

Pour the Rye and Royal Rose Simple Syrup mixture over the top of your infused ice and then add a splash of the Perrier Sparkling Natural Mineral Water for a bit of fizz

Sip to a perfectly cooked steak and your hungry demeanor!

 

Best Chef: Great Lakes, presented by James Beard Foundation 2009  Winner: Michael Symon

James Beard Foundation

About me:

Warren Bobrow is the Food and Drink Editor of the 501c3 non profit Wild Table on Wild River Review located in Princeton, New Jersey.

He is one of 12 journalists world-wide, and the only one from the USA to participate in the Fête de la Gastronomie– the weekend of September 22nd. 2012 in Paris and Burgundy.

He attended Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans, the Boston Cocktail Summit and the Manhattan Cocktail Classic.

Warren presented freestyle mixology at the International Food Bloggers Conference in Portland, Oregon. (2012)

Warren judged the Iron Mixology competition at the Charleston Wine and Food Festival (2012)

Warren has published over four hundred articles on everything from cocktail mixology to restaurant reviews to travel articles- globally.

You may also find him on the web at: http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

 

Lil Cowboy Cocktail. Reprinted from The Beekman 1802 Boys Website

http://beekman1802.com/food-and-wine/gartending-lil-cowboy.html

Gartending: Lil’ Cowboy

By 

Photo: Warren Bobrow, Leica M8

For the Spring and Summer growing season, we bring you a new feature at Beekman 1802, the Soused Gnome.  He’ll teach  you how to “gartend”–create perfect seasonal cocktails using fresh ingredients from the garden.

Klaus has been visiting farmers markets all over the country for the past month or so. His first adventure was to Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans, next was to the bread-basket of our nation in Columbus, Ohio. Last weekend he journeyed all the way out to Portland, Oregon to watch me do a presentation on freestyle mixology for the International Food Bloggers Conference held by Foodista.
It certainly stimulated my taste and olfactory senses!
Portland, Oregon is a city of farmers markets. There is a plethora of cocktail friendly ingredients that defy the imagination.
Cherries are in season again out on the left coast. This time the bounty of the garden is in the form of rare white cherries.
White cherries exemplify the gartender’s dream cocktail. When crushed into a cocktail, white cherries are otherworldly on the flavor profile.
Be sure to pit out your cherries before they go into your mixing cup.
We almost never see white cherries on the east coast. Klaus (the Soused Gnome) explains that the cherries flesh is sometimes too tender to travel. He told me that in his home country (Germany) his kinfolk put up sumptuous white cherries in fiery brandy! He goes on to tell me that brandied white cherries are marvelous in a cocktail that includes Denizen Rum, cucumber ice (really!) House Spirits White Dog and freshly squeezed grilled grapefruit juice. The lift for this cocktail is provided by Klaus’s favorite pinpoint seltzer water, the Perrier Sparkling Natural Spring Water. He says that this water reminds him of his youth on the German/French border. I’ve told him that he needs to concentrate on locally sourced ingredients, but he disagrees.
Funny how a drinking gnome can have such an opinion on mixers!
Klaus grew cucumbers this year in the garden. These cucumbers are the European variety (no surprise here) they are seedless. Frozen into the Williams-Sonoma KING ice cube tray (2 inch x 2 inch) the European variety makes for a flavorful augmentation of Klaus’s soon to be infamous cocktail.
I reproduced this drink back in New Jersey with my own home cured cherries. Unfortunately these cherries are red instead of white, but they are delicious all the same. You can reproduce the cherries yourself by pitting out a few pounds of WEST COAST cherries, then covering in the spirit of your choice. Klaus suggests using a light spiced rum or even Apple Jack.
They take a couple of weeks to cure, but Klaus and I both say that the wait is worth it!
I know that after the trip to Oregon, cowboy music plays very well into the re-birth of the West Coast sensibilities that Klaus possesses. His GIANT thirst is only superseded by his ability to drink dozens of (tiny) drinks while roaming the myriad of mixology bars that dot this most interesting of cities.

I created this cocktail “on the fly, free-style” at the IFBC/Freestyle Mixology presentation ‘Lil Cowboy Swing Cocktail (named for Portland, Oregon’s lost cowboy culture)

 

‘Lil Cowboy Swing Cocktail
Ingredients:
(A couple weeks before you make this cocktail “put-up” some home-cured cherries)
Denizen Rum White Rum
House Spirits White Dog (Moonshine) (Oregon Distilled)
Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Roses
Bitter End Thai Bitters
Freshly Squeezed Grilled Grapefruit juice (Slice grapefruit into rounds and sear or grill until charred over charcoal or in a sauté pan) then juice as normal
Home cured Cherries (white if you can find them, red if you cannot)
European cucumber (peeled and sliced into coins for both the ice cubes and the cocktail)
Perrier Sparkling Natural Spring Water
Cucumber water ice- freeze rounds of a European seedless cucumber into an ice cube tray. I recommend the Williams-Sonoma silicone KING CUBE tray- I do a 50/50 blend of freshly juiced cucumber water with filtered water from my Mavea water filtration pitcher (The Mavea pitcher is from Germany- are you surprised?)
Instructions

for two strikingly powerful cocktails
Muddle several rounds of cucumber with some (pitted) home cured cherries in a mixing cup
Add some regular ice (about a handful)
Add 2 oz White Dog from House Spirits
Add 1 oz Denizen Rum (White Rum)
Add 4 tablespoons of Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Roses
Add 4 oz of your grilled grapefruit juice (essential)
Shake, Shake, Shake, Shake
Add a couple cubes of the homemade cucumber ice to your hand-blown cocktail glass
Double Strain into a tall hand-blown glass filled with cucumber ice

Don’t have a hand-blown glass?? Time is now to connect with your cocktail glass!
What does it mean to double-strain? Pour through 2 strainers to remove all bits of cherry and cucumber and grilled grapefruit juice
Add four drops per cocktail glass of the Bitter End Thai Bitters
Top with the Perrier Natural Sparkling Mineral Water (Essential)
Garnish with either a red or white cherry (your choice)

Misbegotten Youth Cocktail features La Clandestine Absinthe

Misbegotten Youth Cocktail

August 20, 2012

Photo: Warren Bobrow – Leica M8

Clandestine Absinthe is a huge surprise!

Towards the beginning of the month of August I received a funky colored blue bottle from Switzerland.

Emblazoned on the label was the Swiss flag and the words that read Methode Ancestrale.

But what does this mean?

And why did the packaged contain little bags of herbs?

Absinthe Herbs

La Clandestine Absinthe

1.   Ysop

2.   Lemon Balm

3.   Anis Seed

4.   Star Anis

5.   Veronica

6.   Fennel Seed

7.   Licorice

8.   Peppermint

9.   Petite Wormwood

10. Grand Wormwood

 

All 10 of these herbs are used in making La Clandestine Absinthe. Quantities are proprietary but all are grown at the distillery with the exception of the following

Star Anis – China

Fennel – Morroco

Anis Seed – Spain

 

The herbs were sent to illustrate the natural elements of the liquor and the bottle is painted blue in the traditional fashion to protect the delicate potion contained within.

And the Swiss Flag?   It really is made in Switzerland.  In the village where Absinthe was distilled for the first time in 1790.

This recipe is a truly historic recipe… 100% natural according to the clever website.

I’ve contracted a particularly virulent strain of poison oak.  I itch all over.  Suddenly even my palms itch.  Not pleasant at all.  I need booze. Either as a topical application or one taken internally.

The doctor would like for me to take a powerful steroid.  I thing something else will work.

Absinthe!

Perhaps I’m the one who is correct?  Well, he certainly couldn’t be more interested in my career as a cocktail writer.  His whole face lit up when I told him what I do!

 

The water is as important as the liquor.  I’m going on record to say this.  I’ve also written about how important the ice is to a cocktail.  That’s why I like to control the quality of my water.

My water filter is no less important than the quality of my spirits.

True, my home is located on a particularly pure water source and I get to this source through a well.

Unfortunately this water source is packed with minerals that burn right through the copper lines.

Without filtration, the water can take on a cloudy appearance.

Hence my Mavea, Inspired Water Pitcher.

Sitting just behind the little tasting bottle of La Clandestine Absinthe is the elegantly designed Mavea Water Pitcher.

Sure we sell them at Williams-Sonoma.  And yes, you can buy one on the web.  I’m not sure why you don’t own one yet?

They are the only filtration system that allows for a totally recycle program.  Use your filter until it’s time to change it and then send it back to the manufacturer for recycling!

That is pro-social.  The Swiss would be very happy to say they invented this system.  But they’d be incorrect in this theory.

The Mavea hails from their neighbors across the Alps.  The Germans!

From a design standpoint the Mavea Water System is the most elegant thing in your refrigerator- except for maybe a bottle of La Clandestine Absinthe.

I recommend doing very little to the clear slurp.

My idea of the perfect cocktail is the simplest in my stable of fabulous drinks.

Since La Clandestine is 106 Proof, you don’t have to do very much to it- to achieve a glorious buzz.

Perhaps a 2:1 ratio of Mavea Inspired Water to La Clandestine Absinthe will work?

I’m sipping a glass right now.  The time is roughly 4:20 in the afternoon.  The sound of the cicadas is melting into the background.  I’m transported to a bucolic farmers market in Columbus, Ohio.  I’m suddenly surrounded by sumptuous blueberries. Veritable bushels of them.

They speak to my sensuous nature.

Muddled Blueberries, La Clandestine Absinthe, Mavea Inspired Water. A big hit of Perrier Sparkling Water???  Crushed ice?  Simple Syrup?

Fresh.

Tasting notes:  World class aroma of fennel, liquorice, peppercorns-both pink and black… Belgian Ale nose- candy sugar finish with lingering notes of white tobacco flowers, flint and the taste of freshly cut spearmint.  This gives way to the gentle notes of orange blossom and wood grilled peaches.

The Cocktail is based on the classic Absinthe Frappe’ from New Orleans.  It’s said that this cocktail evolved from the passionate French speaking residents of New Orleans and the blistering hot summer weather, not unlike what I experienced during Tales.  Hazy, hot and humid.  The perfect cocktail for this type of weather is pastis, but that doesn’t hold enough mystique for me.

My version of the Absinthe Frappe’ is blisteringly strong.  The La Clandestine Absinthe is treated to a slurry of muddled farm fresh blueberries.  Then I hit the muddled blueberries with a 2 oz. shot of La Clandestine.  The color of the blueberries melt into the clear liquor.  There is an uneasy peace.  Splashing drop by precious drop of the Mavea Inspired Water over the top reveals the darker nature of this now muddled blue and white liquor mixture.  Then I add ice, also made from the water in my Mavea pitcher.

Nearly clear in appearance, the ice catches the light from the sun and refracts it into a billion rainbows- each spreading vision and pleasure around the room in a cacophony of light and color!

The blueberries ground this cocktail with the earth, the herbal quality of the liquor swirl around your tongue in a vortex of passion.  Warming you deeply, you cannot escape.

A couple of splashes of the Mavea Inspired Water and Mavea Ice and they in turn capture your heart.

You’re BUZZED!!!

(Isn’t that the idea???)

Cheers.  wb

Danger Level 5 out of 5

The Misbegotten Youth Cocktail

Each Recipe makes ONE cocktail.  I suggest making a pitcher of them, they tend to disappear very quickly!

2 oz. La Clandestine Absinthe (or your choice, I love Tenneyson, Lucid, Nouvelle Orleans, St. Georges, Amerique 1912….)

1/4 cup of the freshest blueberries

Simple Syrup

Crushed ice from the Mavea Inspired Water Pitcher

Water from the Mavea if you don’t have a Mavea you can also use Perrier Sparkling Water.  I think you’ll like this drink a bit fizzy and well chilled…

Fresh mint for garnish

Blueberries frozen into Mavea Inspired Water ice cubes

Preparation:

Muddle the blueberries in a Boston Shaker

Add 2 oz. of the Absinthe

Add 2 oz. of Simple Syrup

Add some fresh ice that you have crushed.  (Hence the frappe’)

Add 3 oz. cool water (very slowly) or Perrier Sparkling Water well chilled

(I’ll imagine that fizzy is more desirable)

Garnish with a sprig of fresh mint

Drink very carefully and with passion!

Hankshaw Hawkins Cocktail

Hankshaw Hawkins Cocktail

The Hankshaw Hawkins Cocktail is woven around a core of All-American Bourbon Whiskey.  With the heat bubbling up from somewhere down South it only makes sense to create a cocktail with a unique refreshing twist.  This twist is ice made from perfect spring water that bubbles up from the ground just up the road apiece.  That pure ice, run through the MAVEA pitcher sitting over there on the butcher block has been infused with spearmint from the garden.  As the ice melts, the flavors of the spicy spearmint melts into this drink.  I also added FEE Brothers Mint Bitters to the ice deepening the sparkling flavor.

I’m a real fan of Four Roses Bourbon Whiskey.  Directly in front of me is a thick, round shouldered bottle of Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey. I especially like the cork finish! Nice touch.

Sure, it’s only 10:00 AM and the heat is rising, the humidity rising and my thirst also rising.  If you’ve been following my writing for any length of time, you’ll know that I have a powerful passion for Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth.  The label clearly reads “BEST ON THE ROCKS WELL CHILLED.”  That my friends calls out to me with a huge smile.

I love my Vermouth mixed into cocktails that include Bourbon Whiskey, served on the rocks with a twist of orange.  There is a citrus laced element in this cocktail.  Similar to an Old Fashioned where fruit is muddled into the drink, I took the fruit flavors and added a bit of char to them.  Char you say?  Yes.  Oranges are a favored flavor in my Hankshaw Hawkins cocktail.  I also like using peaches, primarily because peaches are local and plentiful going forward into the summer months.  To char your fruits you must have some kind of fire, or in a pinch a cast iron pan.  I like to grill my oranges and peaches over hard wood charcoal.  If you don’t have a charcoal grill I suppose you can use that gas thing that you use to cook your dinners outside.

I prefer the flavor of wood smoke in my grilled fruit when using them in a cocktail.

Hankshaw Hawkins Cocktail

A perfectly delicious Fourth of July Cocktail that will tickle your fancy…

Ingredients:

Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey

Carpano Antica Formula

Grilled Oranges and Peaches – figure a couple rounds of orange and about 3 chunks of grilled peach per person

Ice from the MAVEA Water Pitcher, frozen in an ice cube tray from Williams-Sonoma.  I LOVE the KING Tray.  The cubes are two inch square and they melt oh so deliciously and slowly.

Fee Brothers Mint Bitters for the ice

Preparation:

Filter some spring water (locally gathered of course) through the MAVEA Water Pitcher System

Pour into the Williams-Sonoma King Ice Cube trays

Add about 5 drops of the Fee Brothers Mint Bitters directly into each water filled tray

Very finely chop some fresh mint (Spearmint, please) to each ice cube and then freeze as normal

Grill several rounds of oranges and chunks of peaches over hard wood charcoal

Let cool then muddle in a Boston Shaker

Add a couple cubes of regular ice to chill the Bourbon and Vermouth down

Add 2 Shots of Four Roses Small Batch Bourbon Whiskey

Add 1 Shot of Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

 

Shake Shake Shake Shake Shake

Strain into a short cocktail glass with the mint infused ice, then garnish with a chunk of grilled peach or grilled orange and a big sprig of fresh mint

Danger Level 3 out of 5.  Not too dangerous, yet please drink with caution, a couple of these cocktails in the hot sun can be quite beguiling and then quite dangerous!!

http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com

Agent Provocateur Cocktail… by Warren Bobrow from Modenus

 

Warren Bobrow’s Cocktail Hour: Agent Provocateur Cocktail

There is nothing that I enjoy more than simplicity. Simplicity is a sense of place and it belongs in my cocktail glass.

Sometimes I wonder why cocktails have a dozen ingredients or more. Are they trying to cover something up?

In the culinary arts, this myriad of flavors can be distracting from the natural flavors. Covering pure flavor up with disparate ingredients is confusing to the palate.

The same holds true for cocktails!
Keep it simple!

It’s been warmer than usual as of late. My palate calls out for drinks that celebrate the warming of the earth and the quickening of my thirst.
Aperol and Cynar are two liqueurs that deserve more than your passing gaze. The addition of Lucid Absinthe makes this party even more inviting and certainly more interesting.

Agent Provocateur Cocktail was developed with the lush images of the namesake store in mind.
I wanted to create something that slips off easily, but satisfies a certain craving at the same time.
Aperol is combined with a dollop of Cynar- then the mysteriously aromatic Lucid Absinthe makes an appearance.
Freshly squeezed lime and orange juice may fool you. And you might just see, oh!

You have had one too many, they’re so good! You won’t taste a thing!

The take is decidedly different than your usual aperitif cocktail.
This one may help you find your pillow sooner than later.
Be careful of the results or by all means please enjoy the results!

Your choice!
Ingredients for two luscious slurps or more:
4 Shots Aperol
1 Shot Cynar
2 Shots Lucid Absinthe
8 oz. Orange Juice (Essential to be freshly squeezed)
2 shakes Fee Brothers Rhubarb Bitters
Preparation:
To a cocktail shaker, fill ¼ with ice
Add Liqueurs
Add 2 shakes of the Rhubarb Bitters
Shake
Strain into two coupe’ glasses
Garnish with an orange zest

About Warren Bobrow

Warren has published over three hundred articles on everything from cocktail mixology to restaurant reviews. (Served Raw, Drinking in America, DrinkGal.com, Bluewater Vodka, Purity Vodka, Botran Rum, Orleans Apple Aperitif, Marie Brizard, Art in the Age: Root, Snap, Rhuby, Hendricks Gin, Sailor Jerry Rum, Tuthilltown Spirits, Bitter Cube, Bitter Truth, Bitter End-Bitters, Bitters, Old Men…etc. etc.)
He’s written food articles and news for Edible Jersey, Chutzpah Magazine, NJ Monthly, Serious Eats, Daily Candy (Philadelphia) Rambling Epicure (Geneva, Switzerland)
He is one of the cocktail bloggers for Williams-Sonoma and Foodista.
Warren is the On-Whiskey Columnist for Okra Magazine in New Orleans.
He is also a Ministry of Rum judge.
Warren is a self-taught photojournalist and shoots with the venerable Leica M8.
(Digital rangefinder)

The Peat Fire Cocktail

 

Warren Bobrow’s Cocktail Hour: The Peat Fire Cocktail

a fine selection of whiskey's and scotch in sample bottles

Whiskey- just so.

Last week I had the unique opportunity to boil water over a wood stove. Not because I wanted to- but because it was keeping us warm. Water boiled in a kettle over a Jotul woodstove just tastes better somehow in a hot drink.

This week the electric is back on and I am drawn, naturally to the fireplace- not only as a source of heat, but a source of good feelings and relaxation.

Whiskey is on the menu tonight. A tasting of several single malt Scotches. Will I know the difference? I wonder. Bourbon is usually my topic- Scotch is such an intellectual topic. Most of the authorities on Scotch are my friends- they know much more about this spirit than I do.

A cocktail that calls for Scotch, usually would not use a single malt Scotch, unless money is no object for you. Many of my bottles are samples- but it may not be financially feasible to mix a hundred dollar bottle of 18 year old Scotch with freshly squeezed lemon juice!

The Peat Fire is a simple cocktail of my invention. It involves the aroma and flavor of a peat fire burning in a cabin in Scotland. A lemon is juiced and some sweet vermouth added to the mix. Seltzer is employed and a dream is realized. This cocktail tastes fine with an inexpensive, but good smoky Scotch like Johnny Walker Red Label. It’s available almost everywhere in the world.

The Peat Fire cocktail- Serves two

Ingredients:

4 shots Johnny Walker Red Label or your choice of blended Scotch

2 Lemons- juiced

1 shot Sweet Vermouth – Punt e Mes is my go/to

A few splashes of Angostura Bitters

Preparation:

Fill a drink mixer ½ with ice.

Add Scotch

Add Lemon juice

Add Sweet Vermouth

Add Bitters

Shake and strain into a short rocks glass with a couple of ice cubes, finish with seltzer and garnish with a cherry (home cured..NEVER use those awful red things from a jar!)

Warren Bobrow’s Cocktail Hour: HEAT WAVE cooler…

I couldn’t wait for this heatwave to start.  Really.  All year long I’ve wanted to sweat.  That deep down burn that flows through my body.  Sweat flowing from my brow into my eyes, my back soaked on the leather seats of my car.  Yeah, you know what I’m “talking” about.  A real summer heat wave.  You cannot escape.  It’s everywhere.  An egg could be fried on the sidewalk- that kind of heat.

Fortunately I’m here to cool off your frazzled demeanor.  What is that look on your face?  You don’t believe me?

My good friends you are in luck.  I’ve created at this hour of 9:56 am on Thursday a most beguiling of cocktails.  One that will, as I like to put it, mystify and challenge even the most robust of imbibers.  This one my friends garners a 5 out of 5.  Danger Level 5.  I’m getting numb just smelling it.

The ice is as important as the rest of the cocktail.  I recommend spending about 12 bucks on a silicone ice cube tray from Williams-Sonoma.  True there are dozens of other items for sale in the store that I lust over, but for this cocktail, I need a large ice cube that melts- very, very slowly.  Ice is one of my favorite topics.

I’m a fan of liquors from the Near East.  I mean Greece and Turkey.  Raki in Turkey, Ouzo in Greece…

The Moors enjoyed liqueurs and preparations that used anise seeds.  In their attempted conquest of the world, the liquors that they enjoyed in turn influenced others cultures and peoples in the world.  Hence you find Raki in Turkey, Ouzo in Greece, Pastis in France and… Aquavit from the Scandinavian countries.  But what does Aquavit have to do with anise?  Is it because anise is a seed and caraway is a seed as well?  Sure, it’s a stretch, but in flavor transmittal, a stretch is fantastic.. Anise and Caraway just work together.

Another hidden ingredient, at least in the Near East is Rose Water.  The essence of roses can be quite sensual.  They stimulate the feelings of eroticism. I love rose in a cocktail, especially the rose simple syrup from Royal Rose.  I’ve fallen hard for their syrups, but for the summer- in my opinion, nothing goes better with Tenneyson Absinthe than rose syrup.

Blueberries from Driscoll’s.  Organically grown are the base for my cocktail.  I’ve taken these absolutely ravishing blueberries and muddled them with some of the Royal Rose simple syrup of roses until they stain the side of the mixing glass with their juices.  The aroma of blue along with rose is intoxicating to say the least.

Tenneyson Absinthe, made in France with care is clear as a glass window in the perfume grade, cut glass bottle.  But add some seltzer water and the formerly pristine color takes on a shade of cream and blue fruits.  The Aquavit from House Spirits in Portland, Oregon is a hidden Umami flavor.  You sense it.  It’s there.. but soon, very soon you will feel no pain at all.

It’s now 10:32 am.  The air is brisk but steadily heating up.  Soon the leaves outside will begin to wilt.  It’s a true heat wave. I cannot wait to sip this cocktail in the blaze of the summer heat.

You will crave one too.  Crave is not even the word I seek.  Yearn is better.  Hunger.  Thirst.

Bitters should finish this cocktail.  A punch of depth to center that little third eye in the middle of your forehead.  Why the third eye?  So you can see.  Because with your eyes closed (and they will be soon) you’ll need some way to guide you on your spiritual path to enlightenment. My friend Bill York at Bitter End Bitters makes a perfectly respectable Moroccan Bitters.  Woven with the flavors of the Middle East, this salubrious squirt of bitters it more than able to stand up to the task of binding the Absinthe to the Aquavit.

A splash of seltzer water will finish.  And keep you from walking into doors.

One cocktail at a time.  By my patient hand.  Cheers and stay cool if you are able.

BEHİYE Cocktail

Meaning beautiful in Turkish

(with a generous nod of my hat to Joy E. Stocke from the Wild River Review)

Ingredients:

Driscoll’s Blueberries- they’re really the best we can get outside of Maine…

Krogstad Aquavit

Tenneyson Absinthe

Bitter End Bitters

Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Roses

Preparation:

In a cocktail shaker, muddle about 1/4 cup of the Driscoll Blueberries with 2 Tablespoons of Royal Rose simple syrup of Rose until the aroma rises up in the cup, about 10 seconds

Add 1 Shot of Tenneyson Absinthe

Add 1/2 Shot of Krogstad Aquavit

Add four drops of the Bitter End Moroccan Bitters

 

Shake for exactly 15 seconds and pour into a lovely hand blown rocks glass where 2 LARGE ice cubes are resting, patiently…  Add a splash of cooling seltzer and dream.

 

Corrected Coffee? Absolutely!

Corrected Coffee
Posted by Warren Bobrow in Interior Design
19
May

It’s been a rather difficult week this week. First of all I have withdrawl. Last week I was in my element. I was correcting the coffee for the thirsty folks at the VIP/ The Daily Basics Mixology tent.

What is corrected coffee? Corrected coffee is coffee with a kick. And I was the man to provide it.

There wasn’t anyone during the entire event at Brimfield who wasn’t offered a corrected coffee. There is something to be said for this kind of mind eraser/mind opener. After all, at 7 or 8 in the morning, when the coffee is hot, there is ample time to correct the cup in your hand, to augment it, make it better, make it stronger, make it dangerous. Make each mug with PASSION!

I know how to do this. After all, I’m the Cocktail Whisperer!

Corrected Coffee

Each recipe will completely twist your mind, your friend’s and perhaps their friend’s as well. But for this exercise, each recipe serves two persons. Danger Level 5 out of 5! (so be careful)

2 mugs of freshly brewed coffee (try to make it yourself. Starbucks doesn’t count)

4 shots of Snap (USDA Certified Organic Ginger Snap Liqueur)

2 shots of Tenneyson Absinthe

1 shot of Fernet Branca

Bitter End Mexican Mole’ Bitters

Freshly whipped cream

Preparation:

Whip your cream, whip it good, I say whip it… (apologies to DEVO)

Add two shots of the Snap into each mug

Add the coffee to each mug

Add four drops of the Bitter End Mexican Mole’ Bitters to each mug

Top with fresh whipped cream. If you have those imitation cans, shame on you!

Sip and try not to drink too quickly, there’s plenty of time to sleep later in the day…