Mezan Rum & The Common Man Cocktails!

Today we have a guest and brand ambassador for Mezan Rum in the house, for a full week of episodes and then some. We first look at Mezan Rum, of course, where we get a full explanation of the product from the brand ambassador himself: Warren Bobrow.
Not only does he know a lot about Mezan, he’s also a well established and well known cocktail creator in the industry known by all the big names. He’s got four cocktail books with a fifth book on the way this spring. And, we get him for the week to make cocktails with us and shed knowledge.
What can be better than that? He’s a wonderful guy to talk with and friendly on top if it all. Can’t beat that! Now, let’s drink some Mezan, three bottles, three variations with three unique takes on rum.
Also, don’t forget to register to win the Warren Bobrow Treasure Island Refresher Kit from Craft Spirits Exchange!
Warren Bobrow’s Treasure Island Refresher: http://drinkc.sx/cocktailtv
Mezan Rum: http://bit.ly/getmezan

Warren Bobrow’s Books: http://amzn.to/1QLan4v
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ABOUT Common Man Cocktails (CMC)

Common Man Cocktails, inspired by Derrick Schommer’s intimidation when opening a cocktail book, is designed to show viewers how to create some of the most common cocktails to advanced crazy cocktails and to look back at the classics of yesterday. Derrick has learned as he goes and has been actively creating five recipes a week on the channel for over six years, lots of content to keep you entertained for hours!

CMC will teach you how to make some great cocktail designs, give you ideas for new cocktails and introduce you to the latest spirits, liqueurs, syrups, barware and bitters. If you’re looking to become a cocktail enthusiast or need new ideas for your bartending trade, CMC is a great place to start.

Best of Boston? Who? Klaus!

http://www.bestofboston.com/warren-bobrow-boston-shaker/

In our rundown of the best hot chocolate in Boston, a few notable spiked examples made the cut. But should you seek something a little stronger, you’re going to want to head to our favorite barware store, Boston Shaker.

On December 2-3, they host “Cocktail Whisperer” Warren Bobrow, author of cocktail books Bitters & Shrub Syrup Cocktails, Whiskey Cocktails, andApothecary Cocktails (all available through the Boston Shaker online store, by the way) for a book-signing event. BOB_120215_Stroh160_main unnamed

Joining him are Klaus the Soused Gnome—and a mighty strong batch of hot chocolate made with Austrian-made Stroh 160. That’s right, that’s 160-proof rum. Hey, if anyone knows how ward off a winter chill, it’s the Austrians.

For your sipping pleasure, Bobrow’s whipping up traditional and frozen hot chocolate—both boozy, of course. For the adventurous, “shots of Stroh 160 are always available.”

Speaking of adventurous, you might want to keep an eye out for Bobrow’s next book, Cannabis Cocktails, coming out June 2016. (“Just in time forTales of the Cocktail!”). “It’s the first book on the topic of using cannabis as a cocktail ingredient,” Bobrow says. “Not as a get-high-quick ingredient, but as one essential for the alleviation of many ills—I took the tack of the early apothecary-healing and pain relief.”

But for now, we’ll content ourselves with that extra-stiff hot chocolate. Can’t make it out to the party? We got Klaus, er, Bobrow to give us the recipe.

Fabulous Mention of my next book at Tales of the Cocktail.com!

https://talesofthecocktail.com/culture/cocktails-cannabis-curious

Despite authoring a forthcoming book titled “Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, & Tonics,” barman Warren Bobrow is going to harsh your mellow a little: Legally (also regrettably), cannabis cannot be served in U.S. bars. There are a few under-the-radar bartenders who experiment with the controversial herb, according to Bobrow, who also wrote “Apothecary Cocktails” and blogs at The Cocktail Whisperer. But he cautions that those enthusiasts are “taking great risk.” Given the high stakes, he’s not about to spill those beans. But perhaps his guide to infused drinks will make up for the secret-keeping. “Cannabis Cocktails” comes out June 2016, and includes 75 recipes for spirit-cannabis drinks, tonics, syrups and bitters, along with non-alcoholic options. Within, Bobrow lays out multiple methods for decarboxylating the cannabis—to activate the THC—into mixers such as clarified butter or coconut oil, as well as spirit infusions. The range of recipes will take imbibers from early morning to late night. Readers will choose from Vietnamese iced coffee or piña colada (both with cannabis-infused condensed milk), refreshing lemonade and calming herbal teas, or spinoffs inspired by the classics—take an Old Fashioned, for example, made new with homemade cannabis-infused bitters. “This book is for people who are interested in homeopathy,” Bobrow says via phone from his home in Morristown, New Jersey. He wants to disabuse his audience of the long-held cultural mindset that cannabis is only for zoning out or partying. “In researching ‘Apothecary Cocktails,’” he continues, “I found that cannabis has a 2,000 year history as a homeopathic curative, so we’re not creating anything new here. But America wasn’t ready for that content when I wrote my first book,” he says, which was published in 2013. “They’re ready for it now.”  Indeed, medical marijuana is now legal in 23 states, four of which permit legal recreational use (Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and Colorado). But Bobrow swears that recreation was not the focus in this book—he didn’t write it to encourage indulgences. “In folk healing, there’s about 400 ailments that are alleviated with the use of cannabis,” Bobrow says. He hopes that as marijuana becomes more wildly accepted, people will expand their view of what cannabis is capable of and how it can function on the palate, even for those who aren’t likely to light up and inhale. There are two main varieties of cannabis, and Bobrow says both play nicely with all liquors. There’s cannabis sativa, which creates intensity, focus and clarity, and there’s the muscle-relaxing indica, that can also help with sleep (hello, hot toddy). He says some of the cannabis cocktail recipes are inspired not by the base spirit, but by the food people might enjoy while drinking. “If someone’s having a curry, I might use a spunky cannabis strain with a citrusy, barrel-aged 12-year rum.” Mezcal works well with cannabis infusions “because of its smoky and mysterious nature,” Bobrow says. Gin boasts herbaceous notes that blend nicely, though he worries the pale green color may be off-putting for those concerned with the drink’s appearance. One sativa used in the book, OG Kush, is a common medical cannabis, with skunky, diesel-like notes, “but not in a bad way.” Bobrow infuses it in milk or tinctures to make daytime drinks like milk punch or brandy punch. With indica, he likes a strain called Grape Ape, which he uses in evening sippers like hot buttered rum. And don’t worry about overpowering the drink, so long as you keep to specific proportions. “The alcohol content should be one ounce or less,” Bobrow says, “and the cannabis infusion should never exceed 15-20 milliliters in one drink.” The spirits balance off of the strains, he goes on, and chemically speaking, the alcohol will have a decreased effect on you. But that doesn’t mean his drinks are made for crushing it—rec usage is a no-no, remember? “Never drink more than one drink per hour,” Bobrow says. “Everyone assimilates THC differently, but it will compile upon itself in a skinny minute.” If drinkers overdo the cannabis, Bobrow has a remedy: down three peppercorns and a glass of lemonade. It’s a cure he hopes most won’t need. Bobrow is confident that all his drink recipes will get the cannabis-curious where they want to go. The key here is to enjoy the slow ride.

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Talking Cocktails and more

Barrel House American Bar 252 Cabot Street, Beverly, MA 01915
Coming up Friday, August 21, cocktail book author Warren Bobrow will be here to talk about his three books “Bitters and Shrubs” “Whiskey Cocktails” and “Apothecary Cocktails”! Check out the caramelized peach and white balsamic shrub he whipped up paired with the Tavern Style rum from Old Ipswich Rum, who will also be on hand!

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apothecary cocktails in French!
apothecary cocktails in French!

Cocktail Tasting and Author Talk |


August 20, 6-9 pm ’30’s on Film  Peabody Essex Museum Bartlett Gallery 161 Essex Street, Salem, MA 01970


Join author and mixologist Warren Bobrow as he demonstrates an inventive cocktail recipe and explores the connection between cocktails and film. He will sign copies of his book Apothecary Cocktails: Restorative Drinks from Yesterday and Today, available from the Museum Shop.

apothecary cocktails in French!

 

#PEMPM 8/20 6-9pm for cocktail tasting and author talk! More details: http://ow.ly/QPovE

North Jersey (dot com)

“Whiskey Cocktails”: new from Morristown writer

October 26, 2014    Last updated: Sunday, October 26, 2014, 1:21 AM

Whiskey, writes Morristown cocktail expert Warren Bobrow, has long had a reputation as a spirit enjoyed straight out of the bottle “without the benefit of mixers, and often without tasting much of anything except the alcohol’s heat.” Bobrow’s new book seeks to show off how the best whiskeys can be made into phenomenal cocktails. In “Whiskey Cocktails,” (Fair Winds Press, $22.95) he presents 75 classic and modern recipes including a German Pavilion cocktail made with smoked American whiskey and a Late Summer Fizz with rye whiskey and sweet Italian vermouth.

* Whiskey gets a remix

 

* Whiskey gets a remix

 

– See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/whiskey-cocktails-new-from-morristown-writer-1.1118221#sthash.e5CVEqLs.dpuf

Musings on Whiskey by Warren Bobrow for the White Mule Press (thank you!)

Musings on Whiskey from Warren Bobrow

Bobrow_portraitWarren Bobrow announces his new book Whiskey Cocktails and tells how he came to write it. Known as The Cocktail Whisperer, Warren’s vast knowledge of cocktails has spawned a previous book, Apothecary Cocktails, and over 300 articles on food, wine, and cocktail mixology. As our guest blogger, we get a peek inside Warren’s musings about whiskey, spirits and food. Enjoy!

My influence for writing Whiskey Cocktails is one of a most circuitous nature.

Whiskey has rough and tumble roots for me. Initially I looked at whiskey as something that was rough and harsh across my palate.

I wasn’t a whiskey fan until a couple of years ago.

Rum was more my forte, I was a rum judge for the Ministry of Rum in 2010. I also wrote about food, and, of course wine. It’s very tough to make a living being just one more voice in the room of food writing or even wine writing.

Coincidently, many of those rums that I was starting to enjoy became even more intriguing for me. Through research, I found that many types of rum were aged in used bourbon barrels.
Perhaps that flavor of char and smoke was more a part of my taste buds than I initially allowed?

It’s funny for me, when I think of the wines that I grew up with at home — the ones that were on the our dinner table — Left Bank, Rhone, Loire, all use casks that speak clearly of the place. There was a flavor to each sip. Something unique and profound was taking place at the same time in my education. I traveled across Europe, Africa, and South America, always tasting, memorizing and trying to figure out flavors of intoxicants and food.

The same holds true for whiskey. The casks that go on to give other liquors unique qualities, characteristics and above all terroir may be from whiskey!

There is a certain cadence to whiskey and in the broader metric, craft sprits. They are not always great, but they certainly are passion in a bottle.

My thoughts on craft mean something that is handmade in small numbers. Craft means flavor and texture and risk, small business is not easy. Owning something that relies upon consumers is often fraught with failures. I know because I lost my own small business in Hurricane Hugo back in 1989. I owned a craft business, specializing in fresh pasta. (Maybe it was the grain??)

It might be a small produced wine, organic and Biodynamic that reminds me of whiskey, the flavors of stone fruits and caramelized nuts. Or vice versa. There are creative interrogatories in all forms of intoxicating beverages.

I’m very fond of food when I taste whiskey or any spirits for that matter. If I taste rye, I want a sandwich like a Rueben, piled high with briny and smoky corned beef or pastrami on seeded rye. Whiskey just calls out for food that speaks to me clearly.

Whiskey Cocktails, is my second book. My first book, Apothecary Cocktails takes the tack of what you took for healing in the years before electricity and refrigeration. How folk healing remedies may have been little more than snake oil, but what a wonderful way to heal what ailed ye!

Whiskey Cocktails explores the liquor from a stylistic approach — Scotch, Bourbon, Rye, Alternative Grains, Indian (India), Japanese, French, Tennessee Sipping Whiskey, White Whiskey, etc. even cooking recipes!

In a former part of my life, before I was in the corporate world, I was a trained chef. This formal training comes in handy for the mixology business. It’s all about flavor and combinations of flavor.

I invite you to peer into my mind, one sip and word at a time.

There are some marvelous things in Whiskey Cocktails. Others have said that this book is a new Classic. I’m not sure, I’d rather be humble than a know it all. As I said, I’m new to whiskey and I’m lucky to be here, surrounded by and growing to be respected among my peers as a member of the table.

If they only knew the path I took to get here! Whew!
Bobrow-Cover
I invite you to purchase Whiskey Cocktails and if you haven’t already, please consider Apothecary Cocktails as well.

You can read my musings at http://www.cocktailwhisperer.com or purchase my book at: http://www.qbookshop.com/authors/17884/Warren-Bobrow.html

Thank you.
Warren Bobrow

FEW Spirits/ Five Questions…

FEW Spirits/Five Questions

September 26, 2014
I recently spoke to Paul Hletko, the founder of FEW Spirits in Illinois.

It’s been a while since I embarked on this project, known as the Five Questions, and I beg your time to read the questions and drink the highly personal answers from each craft distiller whom I see worthy of your attention.

 

Without further adieu, may I present Paul Hietko.

 

1. WB:  What do Craft Spirits mean to you?

PH: To me, “craft spirits” means passion for product over all else and actually made by the folks claiming to make it.  Authenticity and honesty is the key.

2. WB:  Where are you from?  What did you do before you became a distiller?

PH: I was born in the Chicago area, grew up in Michigan, spent time in Northern California, and have lived in Chicago now for over 20 years.  Prior to becoming a distiller, I pursued several creative passions, and played guitar professionally, as well as running a record label, building custom guitar effects pedals, and more.  I also had a desk job for many years, but always strived to pursue dreams.

3.  WB: What is your favorite food?  Which of your spirits go well with that dish?

PH: My favorite food depends on my mood.  I’m currently a bit obsessed with banh mi, as well as working on some homemade curries. I’m really digging the bourbon with the banh mi, as the spiciness of the bourbon plays well with the spices in the sandwich.

4. WB: Is there anything you’ve eaten or sipped that brings a tear to your eye when you taste it?  Why?

PH: Some of the favorite things I sip are products that my friends make, as I know what it takes to bring it to life.  Food and drink can have such a dramatic affect, and eating various foods can really bring me back to various places.  I can’t eat matzo ball soup without missing my grandmother.  I can’t think of Spätzle without missing my grandmother’s!

 

5.  WB: Social Media brought us together originally.  What are your thoughts on Social Media?  Do you use it?  Do you have time to Tweet?

PH: I love social media – it’s the best way to communicate with the people that actually consume what we make.  All that we do, we do for the spirit that is in the glass so that we can hopefully be a part of peoples enjoyment of life with their family and friends.  That means a lot to us, and this connection with our fans is truly amazing.

 

My tasting Notes for these gorgeous spirits…

FEW Bourbon Whiskey

Spanish Leather, sweet cream and wet stones give way to a bit of heat and that long finish that says CRAFT.  This is very drinkable stuff, worthy of your finest glassware

FEW Rye Whiskey

If I could drink a corned beef sandwich, this is what I’d be enjoying for lunch!  Smoky notes of charred earth, tangy and cinnamon tinged rye bread with a zingy finish that goes on and on!

FEW Single Malt Whiskey

Is this whiskey from Scotland?  Nope, it’s all American!  Licks of wood smoke give way to sweet grains and a haunting finish punctuated by toasted citrus zest and salt crusted stones.  This is sophisticated and worldly.  Class act!

FEW Barrel Gin

Sweet notes of long cooked grains enrobed in dark (70% or more) bittersweet chocolate, cooked slowly with the aromatics of Juniper Berries and slowly cooked stone fruits, like quince and peaches.  A Ramos Gin Fizz with this slurp would take you to places not yet discovered!

 

My second book, Whiskey Cocktails is available ever so shortly on Quarto Publishing.  In the book, I’ve created 75 new and re-imaged cocktails for one of the world’s favorite spirits, Whiskey… With my unique- Cocktail Whisperer style and grace. 

 

Teeling Whiskey and Barrell Bourbon, Two Delights, recently discovered. from Foodista.com (yes, I’m on the masthead!)

Teeling Whiskey and Barrell Bourbon, Two Delights, recently discovered.

Whiskey Cocktails is coming out in a few short weeks, so it seems to reason that my mailbox is suddenly full of whiskey!In this case I’ve received several fine bottles that I’d like to share with you.  The first one is Ireland in every sip.  The Spirit of Dublin, Teeling Whiskey is one such example of high quality.  They represent Ireland in each sip, in fact when I uncorked the bottle, the very aroma placed me on the Temple Bar, enjoying the mist against my face and Irish Whiskey woven into coffee, filling my belly with happy warmth.

I’m trying not to lose sleep over claims about what Craft Distilling means outside of marketing, nor am I getting bent out of shape about “Small Batch” and what actually constitutes that statement in the broad context of the word.

But what I will say is Teeling Whiskey makes statements on their label about the lack of chill filtration and the fact that they use former rum casks for a deeper and sweeter finish.  What I do know is that they use cork on their bottle finish and I do like that extra effort for quality.

I also like the bottle shape and the color- a deep brown/green/black that should ostensibly protect the fine spirits held within from damaging rays of the sun.  Who knows, but it certainly is a handsome bottle design.

The label evokes the feeling of another time- perhaps less hurried.  And when enjoyed out of my Bormioli tasting glass, I truly get what this whiskey has to offer.

It’s really luscious in the mouth and it finishes astonishingly sweet without a hint of smoke- because in Ireland their whiskies are sweet in their flavor profile.

 

For that reason I like to craft cocktails with Irish Whiskey

Teeling is as good as I’ve had in what appears to be a well crafted spirit. It’s something new and I know you will want to taste it.  So seek it out and don’t be afraid to mix it up a bit.  To that end I offer you a fine cocktail.

Black Irish Smash

 We know that adventurous Spanish sailors followed the Gulf Stream up to Ireland looking for conquests and fishing grounds.  Some stayed and gave the island an entirely new population.  Black Irish people, are the amalgamation of Irish people and those Spanish sailors.  Hence the cocktail.

2 oz. Teeling “Small Batch” Irish Whiskey

4 oz. home-made lemonade – Sweetened to taste with your own mint simple syrup (Mint Simple Syrup 1:1 mint to sugar to 1 cup almost boiling water- steep overnight or longer in the fridge and then filter out mint)

1 oz. Mountain Valley Sparkling Water

4 drops El Guapo Chicory-Pecan Bitters

very tiny pinch of sea salt

Prep:

To a mixing glass, fill 3/4 with ice

add the lemonade and pour the whiskey over the top and stir until mixed

Strain into two rocks glasses with one cracked 2×2 cube in each

Top with a splash of the sparkling water, add a very small pinch of sea salt

Finish with the bitters and garnish with a sprig of fresh mint for clarity

 

Barrell Bourbon is clearly getting my attention because it tastes like success.  Good luck finding it though- you can make this your quest, like that of Pappy Van Winkle, another very hard to get commodity.  I think that Barrell is a bit easier to get because of the nature of distribution.  They are not a huge company yet, so sale of this whiskey is pretty normal.  If you find it, buy it because a case is just six bottles and there aren’t too many of them around.

But why give you only bad news?

That’s certainly not my intention.

They say that Barrell Bourbon served at cask strength is just too strong for most palates.  So it needs a bit of water to reveal the inner flavors.  But I think it needs some mixing up.  Perhaps that’s just the twisted part of why I love what I do.  May I suggest doing a wash with Lucid Absinthe in your glass?  Then some pineapple that has been both grilled and then juiced?  Perhaps a sage leaf, lit on fire and the smoke captured by the inside of a Boston shaker?  The honor for teaching me this technique is firmly on the shoulders of the head bartender from Secreto in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Chris Milligan.  He taught me this art.

Ah.. it’s darned good stuff.  Pay attention though.  This cocktail does work with any high proof bourbon or rye.

The Antidote

3 oz. Barrell Bourbon (bottling 002, because 001 just isn’t around any longer)

1/4 oz. Lucid Absinthe- wash rocks glasses with Lucid Absinthe and a bit of ice to cool, let sit

2 oz. Grilled Pineapple juice

1 oz. Freshly Squeezed Lime Juice

1/2 oz. Freshly Squeezed Grapefruit juice

2-3 Sage Leaves

Crushed Ice

1 oz. Simple Syrup

3-6 Drops of El Guapo Gumbo Bitters

Sprig of mint

 

Prep:

Light your sage in a fireproof ashtray

Capture the sage smoke in your Boston Shaker

Fill the Boston Shaker 3/4 with ice (and the sage smoke)

Add the juices and the simple Syrup

Add the Barrell Bourbon

Cap and shake for 20 seconds

Pour out the water and the Lucid absinthe into your mouth (why waste good liquor?)

Add 1 cube of 2×2 ice to each glass

Pour your mixture over the ice

Dot with the El Guapo Gumbo Bitters

Garnish with the mint

Serve to a happy camper