Distillation Without Inebriation: Seedlip

Seedlip- Photo Credit Warren Bobrow (iPhone 6s)

Read the entire article here, at Forbes

If there is a flavor that most exemplifies aromatics of the British countryside- it would be the profusion of herbs and flowers that bloom along the thorny hedgerows lining the narrow pathways. Of course, to experience this in real life would mean a trip to Great Britain. IF, you were able to accomplish this trip, a leisurely bicycle ride would be necessary to gain the entire experience of sipping Seedlip. Why a bicycle ride you may ask? To be able to smell the air as you rode down any given country path, brushing your arms against the herbs and flowers, releasing their perfume.

Mixologists Share Their Best Cannabis-Infused Cocktails

by Zoe Wilder

Without cannabis, drinks are basic.

Whether you’re hosting a soiree, brunching with friends, or planning a romantic dinner, these three alluring alcohol and cannabis-infused libations by guest contributors (and epicureans)  Elise McRobertsRabib Rafiq, and Jason Eisner will set the tone for the occasion. Since mixing cannabis and alcohol can be synergistically intoxicating, it’s wise to consume responsibly and control your dose. Some recipes call for cannabis-infused liquors and tincture, which can be difficult to find yet simple to make at home. To help, reference this recipe for Green Dragon, break out your Magical Butter machine or pick up a copy of Warren Bobrow’s Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics where you can dive a little deeper into the sea of D.I.Y. cannabis tinctures. Now who’s ready for a drink? 
Photo credit: Povy Kendal Atchison/The Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook​
Read More At Merry Jane

Dawn To Dusk Drinking: Madeira, Hamilton and Betsy Schuyler

Dawn To Dusk Drinking: Madeira
Warren Bobrow (Leica M8)

Back in time- way before Alexander Hamilton was mortally wounded on the Weehawken Cliffs, defending his perceived honor- the young officer served under General George Washington.  He was posted to the winter headquarters of the Continental Army in Morristown, NJ.  It was in this quaint village that Hamilton met with the young Betsy Schuyler. He made his intentions clear- and married her. All would have been well and good if it wasn’t for the vast quantities of potent fermented spirits that were poured down the gullet from dawn to dusk rendering even the stoutest gentlemen into a blithering idiot by late afternoon.

Read More At Forbes Magazine

Warren M. Bobrow: Author/Barman/Cannabis Alchemist

Cedar Ridge Distilling: Whiskey

It’s Iowa and Corn Means Craft — Cedar Ridge Distilling: Whiskey

Warren Bobrow

Grandpa Melvin’s Hands  (Leica M8)

It takes more than great ingredients to make craft whiskey. It takes patience and time, that is for certain. But most importantly, after all the bills are paid- whiskey takes great passion. You cannot make quality whiskey in mere hours, although some manipulators of spirits say that they can. I unequivocally disagree and believe that craft spirits take on their own unique personalities according to the particular desire of the distiller. The production of craft spirits takes years to develop their own deeply textured flavors.

There is that little thing that they call the Angel’s Share. That’s the stuff that you cannot sell, because it has evaporated. Not generally a fine place to be if you are in the business of bottling expensive craft whiskey- or any craft spirit for that matter. Each drop costs something and it’s a shame when it evaporates to only be enjoyed by the: ‘Angels!’  Depending on many variables, this Angel’s Share can be pretty expensive or just about right.

READ MORE @ https://www.forbes.com/sites/warrenbobrow/2017/09/01/its-iowa-and-corn-means-craft-cedar-ridge-distilling-whiskey/#149b700b703c

Cannabis Cocktails & Drinks: What You Should Know

Drink Your Medicine, But Proceed With Caution

Have you toyed with the thought of adding cannabis to your cocktails? Now that many states in the U.S. have legalized some form of marijuana use, the conversation about mixing alcohol and cannabis is more important than ever.

Before you mix up a cannabis-infused cocktail, there are a few things you should know. This is not a matter that should be taken as casually as the average cocktailor smoking a joint.

Weed Recipes: Top 10 Best Cannabis Cookbooks

I’m so very honored!

Edibles are a fun, convenient and covert way to consume cannabis, whether for recreation or medical purposes. Edibles are yummy treats infused with marijuana, that deliver the medicinal and psychoactive ingredients to your system without having to smoke anything. They can take the form of anything from brownies to borscht, with the help of infused oils like cannabutter. You can make savory cannabis foods like spaghetti, sweet treats like cookies and candies, or even drinks like cocktails and marijuana tea. If you want to get started making your own edibles at home but do not know how, don’t worry – there is a cannabis cookbook out there for you! In this list we will go over our top 10 favorite edibles cookbooks, featuring recipes for all tastes, budgets, and skill levels. You will find omnivorous and vegan treats, sweet and savory, complex recipes and some that take as little as five minutes to prepare.

If you want a more in-depth look on how to make cannabutter and other cannabis oils, check out our How To Make Pot Brownies post where we cover all of the steps. Make sure to follow all local laws when growing, processing, or eating your cannabis!


1. ‘Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations’ by Warren Bobrow

'Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations' by Warren Bobrow, best weed cookbook, marijuana cooking

One of the newest ways people are enjoying cannabis is by combining it with cocktails and mocktails. This is especially popular at dinner parties in the any states where cannabis has recently become legal for recreation. But, with a strong taste and a particular method of infusion necessary, beginners may not know how best to make cannabis cocktails. This book has a collection of 75 cannabis drink recipes by “The Cocktail Whisperer” Warren Bobrow. It also includes a full history of cannabis as a social and medicinal drug. You will find recipes not only for cocktails but for shrubs, bitters, butters, oils and even coffee, tea and milk-based drinks for the morning hours. This is a really fun book for anyone who loves drinks and cannabis.

Price: Kindle $2.99 Hardcover $17.57

Buy Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics here

READ MORE AT: http://heavy.com/garden/2016/06/weed-recipes-top-10-best-cannabis-cookbooks/

 

5 Superb And Refreshing Summer Drinks Containing Grapefruit

5 Superb And Refreshing Summer Drinks Containing Grapefruit

And as an extra bonus, cannabis!

refreshing
Photo by Flickr user Wine Dharma

When the temperature rises above 90 degrees for what seems like days on end. When the swamp that is slowly running down your back makes a beeline for your brow- burning on the way down… you know that it is time for a refreshing little cocktail. One that smacks of tart and slightly acerbic flavor- a touch of smoke- a hint of sweet- the peel of citrus, the oil of grapefruit. I think I known what I love to drink is none other than the Hemingway Daiquiri. Here are five riffs on the classic Hemingway mind eraser. Two have medical grade Cannabis in the mix- I’ll suggest the strains too.

Decarbing is essential to my method of making cocktails that have the good stuff in them. THC. I don’t work with CBD, so please- don’t ask. I know nothing of it- and quite frankly think most of it is a shameless money grab. Hemp is rope, building materials, cosmetics- not carefully crafted cocktails made with non-commercial spirits. I’ve been pretty clear on this one from day one. I suggest looking at that snake-oil (CBD) being dripped into your gin and tonic then ask what exactly is this going to do? Absolutely nothing- because the product has nothing psycho-active in it. My late step-father was always dismayed when he couldn’t buy Hemp lines for his yacht. He’d say- cut a piece and smoke it.

Say Cheese!

Are you mystified by cheese?  Do you see a cheese plate and instinctively think that it’s an expensive dessert?  Have you ever taken a cheese class?  Would you know that cheese goes really well with spirits?

If your answers are yes, no, no and no, then you’ll probably be hungry – and hopefully thirsty by the time you finished reading.  Why?  Because cheese is not pretentious, nor is it only for dessert!  In fact, cheese is something that is made by hand in the same manner as it has for hundreds of years- and cheese is created by farmers!  There are certainly machine-made cheeses, but for the intent of this article, all the cheeses in the classes at the French Cheese Board in Manhattan are made by hand in the ancient fashion of the cheese maker.   So, you should not be mystified.

Far from mystified, what is needed to truly TASTE cheese is to cut off your ability of smelling the cheese first.  There are many taste receptors in our mouths that are incredibly sensitive, but unfortunately most cheese is tasted with our noses first.  And if you can close your eyes while you are tasting cheese, there is another whole set of senses that are fooled by your visual sensibility.

Located in the trendy-eastern fringes of SoHo, where the old city collides with Nolita, the French Cheese Board in its handsome and sleek space.  It is filled with ample sunlight and is a very friendly place indeed.  This outpost of French culture in the Big City, seeks to demystify cheese by taking cheese out of its usually pretentious context completely.  Instead of merely snacking on cheese, they suggest carefully tasting cheese, but not overwhelming the plate with superfluous parts.  Instead of a grilled-cheese sandwich, serving a small cheese slice- served simply with dried fruit, plain crackers (so not to overpower the delicate flavors) and perhaps some rugged coins of dry baguette will more than suffice as an accompaniment.

Cheese served simply on a cheese board become a compliment to dinner, not solely a means to an end after dinner when you are already full.

The ancient style of making cheese, on a cheese board, or alone- Goat Cheese is a fine way to start a meal. I tend to prefer a combination of old and new goat cheeses, carefully rolled into a log and then further aged in straw- in a special cheese cave.  This amalgamation of funky and sweet calls out for a number of liquid accompaniments.  Many of the liquids that I suggest for goat cheese are not wine.  Goat cheese, especially aged (chalky and funky in the somewhat barnyard nose) takes to the more botanical style of gin with a tongue in cheek sense of humor.  There is nothing that I enjoy more in the summer months than a gin and tonic with a nice crumbly goat cheese between my fingers.  For the gin component I’d suggest the Barrel Aged Barr Hill Tom Cat (style).  A couple months in new American oak translates to a richening and deepening of the already sensuous quality inherent in each sip of Barr Hill Gin.  A touch of vanilla, toasty oak and raw honey reveal themselves into a tangle of sweet and tangy across the palate.  Couple with that a cane sugar tonic water such as Q-Tonic (from Brooklyn no less), a hunk of lime and you have the next wave of cheese sophistication.  This is the way I want to start my next meal, with elegance and candor.

A firm, well aged, mountain-style cheese from the French Alps calls out for a whisky from Japan that mimics in its own inimitable way the magnificent Scotch Whiskies from the other side of the globe.   For a firm, yet oily cheese such as these highly expressive examples from the extreme altitudes of the Alps, a richly textured whisky provides back-bone against the creamy firmness of the hand-made cheese.  The Nikka Coffey Grain Whisky is distilled drop by precious drop from a Coffey still dating to the early 1960’s.  A Coffey Still is a type of Pot Still made of copper. It makes richly textured liquor that has a warm nutty flavor in its approach.  Similar on the flavor wheel to the earthy quality of the French- mountain cheeses.  A fine match for stimulating the palate before or even after dinner.

Francois, the gregarious and ever-smiling “Professeur de Fromage” comes from a long line of cheese makers.  His studied and conversational flair for history is filled with humorous narratives and beneficial hints to the history of cheese.  All of these made even more interesting because of the ultimate enjoyment of the finest cheeses available and he does this without any pretentiousness.  He demystifies the different varieties, goat, sheep, cow- and breaks each one down into its unique components of flavor.  Sour, sweet, tangy, umami- what?  What is that?  I think it’s the indescribable flavor.  The one between here and there.  Confusing?  Perhaps it is- but after taking a most basic class at the French Cheese Board you’ll certainly be less confused, and considerably more knowledgeable in the art of cheese as more than a metaphor.

Getting back to how flavor is revealed, Francois offers you a mask to cover your eyes with a and your nose is closed with a kind of swimmer’s nose clip.  This is to encourage textural feeling the surface of the cheese through your fingers, neither smelling the cheese, nor viewing it.

Is the cheese dry, soft, grainy, crumbly, wet, sticky, polished…?

The list of textures goes on and on.
French cheese comes in all forms, from hard, used for grating, to liquefied and unctuous, meant to be spooned and savored.  There are many varieties and no, cheese is not just for dessert.  It makes for an incredible aperitif with slivers of black footed Spanish Iberico Ham, meant to stimulate the thirst and the appetite.

For nibbling on Iberico Ham and Washed Rind Cheese I would suggest a slightly salty “Fino” Style Sherry such as the Bodegas Grant “La Garrocha” Fino Sherry NV (Andalucia, Spain)  The crisp and aromatic nature of this nearly bone dry sherry will cut the fat both of the cheese and the pork flesh with alacrity.

Sure, you can enjoy cheese without a blindfold on and certainly without a nose clip blocking your passage to the ability of scent.  But isn’t it interesting to dismiss most French cheeses because they may be overly assertive in aromatics.  That is certainly a fact of life when dealing with washed rind cheeses and still others that turn into liquefaction through aging and cannot be eaten without a spoon, it would just be too sloppy!  But delicious!

Cheese and the study of cheese is as easy as taking a walk down to the French Cheese Board, conveniently located at 41 Spring Street in Nolita.  Bring and open mind and taste yourself into another way of being.  One that embraces the passion for hand-made cheese!

Cheers from all of us at