Kurvana

In the Mind of An Author, Journalist & Chef: Warren Bobrow

I am so excited to share my passion for cannabis with the esteemed company—Kurvana. I was charmed by two 510 Kurvana cartridges enough to go to their website and poke around. The social media landscape in real time makes for many such rabbit holes, so I didn’t know what I was in for. What follows is my first-hand experience with two Kurvana strains: Pineapple Express, this month’s SOTM, and True OG, a classic.

I have written several books but my current one, Cannabis Cocktails, is by far my favorite one because I like Cannabis! Yes, I like to smoke it and to play around with it in craft cocktails (look me up, I’ve been having fun with this for a while). I enjoy it. Perhaps more than alcohol, and alcohol is the business that I work in! So, I had to figure out what to do that could make me a livingcannabis or liquor. Why not both?

The other 510 cartridge that I tasted was True OG. A dank and richly textured draw that led to volumes of thick vapor redolent of cedar and lemon zest dripping in first press, like olive oil across the tongue. It’s an introspective high, one that comes with an understanding of the forces of nature as well as the ability to see into the future. Well, maybe not, but the True OG is quite intellectual. I wouldn’t say it made me smarter, but the vapor did coat the inside of more than one cocktail glass. You see, it’s possible to scent the inside of a cocktail glass with the exhaled vapor from your hit. Blowing the vapor inside the pre-chilled glass makes the smoke ‘stick’ to the inside. Then you can build your craft cocktail quite easily- now that the inside of the glass has been ‘washed’ with vapor. The True OG calls out for savory instead of sweet applications. I would build a Manhattan-esque cocktail with damned good Whiskey from Barrell Bourbon… something like Dolin- a drier- rather than a sweeter approach to the Vermouth and good old Angostura Bitters- make for the ideal cocktail. Of course, if you want to add a cherrymake sure you cured them yourself- with THC and good Kentucky Bourbon- lots of cane sugar if you want them candied- or raw honey.  It’s all good.

Kurvana cartridges serve as more than just a mere metaphor for living–they are part of my way of being. Join me in sharing your experiences with Kurvana!

-Warren

Pot and Cocktails: The Next Frontier With Prop 64?

Gallery

Tweet Voters in nine states got to make their opinions known on marijuana last November, and they spoke loudly in favor of it. Eight of the nine ballot initiatives to legalize or deregulate pot passed, officially making cannabis legal for … Continue reading

Five Tips To Simplify The Daily Grind Of A Bartender

If you’re a bartender looking to simplify your daily grind, it’s time to get back to the old fashioned basics. Here are five simple and inexpensive things you can do today to make that behind the bar job shine!

1. Cut with a knife and not with a peeler

Warren Bobrow

As my friend Gary Regan teaches in his “Cocktails in the Country” bartender training – when an orange is presented for use as a garnish, cut with a knife and not with a peeler. You would think that a peeler is faster because on a busy night and you have that orange in your hand and you want to go faster.  A conundrum when you are slammed- at the very least.  But one that is easily solved. Ditch the quick peeler in favor of your trusty companion. What is it? The basic item, your paring knife. It’s an elegant tool and it connects you with the past, the mastery taking your time.  Of conscious bartending. You will learn over time not to let this knife out of your sight, lest it come back with a broken tip, or you see it being used to open thick cardboard boxes. Use this paring knife when you cut all of your citrus.  It’s a bit slower on the peel, but far more rewarding to your guest when you take your time and connect with the zest.  It smells better too for some reason.    

2. Ice is nice.  Pretty simple, right?  

I’m convinced in my time working in the liquor industry that there is good ice, but more often than not, there is lousy ice.  I think that the use of quarter cubes is taking advantage of the guest by diluting their drink.  The quarter cube should only be used in a water glass.  Cocktails just look and taste better with a larger cube of ice, preferably a round or a square shape instead of a slice.  I am an intellect with ice- it’s important to me.  Ice is the most important ingredient in a craft cocktail.  Ice can make or break that event of dining out so don’t give your guests a glass of diluted top shelf liquor for their hard earned money.  Encourage your bar-back to use silicone trays to make large ice cubes to show off your expensive, top shelf whiskies.  The guest remembers how impressive this looks in their glass and will tell everyone about their ice experience.  If the sky is the limit, consider having Glace Ice in your bar.  They make perfect rounds and cubes.  I’ve rarely seen anything like them.  If you are in NYC, I’m told that Hundredweight is the way to go.  Out here on the perimeter we have ice companies, I’d ask for a 50-pound block and ask (nicely) if they would consider cutting 1 pound chunks out of the block.  You can train your staff to hand cut ice for a drink.  It’s a class act to be seen cutting your own ice.

3. Natural and Organic

Now more than ever with the utter explosion of natural and organic foods, the attention is poised towards the liquor industry.  How do you make a product that tastes delicious and captures the consumer’s interest in eating (and drinking) more healthfully?  Fortunately, there is a green colored label that appears on the liquor bottle that shows that the product is certified Organic.  It reads USDA Certified Organic.  To drum up sales, side by side tastings can be organized for your guests.  Organic vs. non-Organic liquors (and beers) will drive sales, it’s well proven. Certainly the conversation that includes craft liquors made from organically grown ingredients couldn’t hurt from the standpoint of more sales.  Your guests are already doing their shopping at Whole Foods, so you know they are eating better, why not drink better too?   An organic liquor like a vodka may start an entire pathway of liquid driven education for your guest.  Then you can start juicing all your citrus fresh. (We can always hope).  And that’s not even scratching the surface of Biodynamic and Organic wine production.  There is a lifetime of spirits education available to your guests that costs absolutely nothing and makes your bar staff the go/to for learning of all kinds.  Which of course adds to sales and your bottom line.  Make it fun!   

4. Bartenders need something to do, everyone should have some sort of side-work

Bar staff should be always cleaning glasses, doing something with their hands, instead of tapping at their phones.  If you are like me, having started in the food industry as a lowly pot-scrubber/dish washer back in the mid-1980’s (way before cell-phones), I’m pretty particular about caring for fine glassware. Certainly the modern equipment is more sophisticated now in this era of fast and casual dining. The new mechanized technology certainly does a better job with clarity due to modern chemicals and judicious applications of heat.  I like to offer an old-fashioned approach that is very effective for putting an extra shine on the glassware.  Add a few capfuls of regular white vinegar to a spray bottle with plain tap water.  Spray inside the glasses with this mixture and wipe with a lint free cloth.  The finish will be sparkling and the white vinegar neutralizes any remaining odors that sometimes linger inside the dish machine.  Clean all the liquor and the wine bottles that are around the bar with this mixture.  I like to use a colorful French style kitchen towel.  It’s fun. 

5. Punch!

Make a punch of the day.  It’s easy and inexpensive.  One of the great ways to get rid of products that are at the bottom of the bottle is by making a punch of the day.  And since this is the end of many bottles, you should always use the very best juices available.  This makes the use of the end of the bottle impossible to detect.     

There is nothing wrong with doing things simply and with love. A smile goes a long way.  Remember the guest is coming to see you, it’s just not the other way around. Don’t ever forget that!

https://totalfood.com/five-tips-simplify-daily-grind-bartender/

Legal Cannabis Sales Threaten Liquor Industry

By  January 30, 2017

The alcohol industry organization, the Wholesale Spirits and Wine Association (WSWA) is unhappy about legalized cannabis. At their recent 72nd meeting, a seminar entitled, “Everything You Need to Know about Marijuana Legalization,” took place in a packed room with an invite list filled with names from the government and the cannabis industry there to discuss the explosion of legal cannabis and what they can do about it.Alcohol wholesalers attended this seminar because they can no longer ignore the fact that cannabis legalization is sweeping the country, and their long-held dominance over the world of intoxicants will be changing in the future.Their anxiety over legal cannabis sales threatening liquor industry profits isn’t unfounded, as early metrics point to that specific market effect in states like Colorado, where adults voted for the right to choose marijuana as a safer alternative.Recent articles in the Mark Brown newsletter show beer sales in certain markets have been adversely impacted by the legal sales of cannabis, and the Cowen Insight states, “In adult use cannabis markets, there are clear signs that cannabis is weighing on beer category trends, with CO, WA and OR underperforming the overall beer market by ~260 bps, YTD. Mainstream beers are the biggest drag, while craft is also slowing.”On January 12, Institutional Cannabis Investors held a gathering of investors at Cowen and Company in NYC, a 100-year-old Wall Street investment banking house who recently initiated coverage for the cannabis market. This groundbreaking event means that legal cannabis is now a big enough money-maker for traditionally conservative Wall Street to use as an investment vehicle.New risk factors have been placed on stalwart liquor companies such as Molson Coors, Constellation Brands and Brown Forman, according to an article on Bloomberg that quotes Cowen analyst Vivien Azer saying: “The rise of marijuana is affecting many large companies in the alcohol industry, making it critical to study the topic.”

Cowen and Company’s recent 110-page report on the state of the cannabis industry further proves that cannabis sales do take a bite out of liquor sales, a fact that the powerful liquor industry cannot ignore.

Azer authored an article entitled “Legal Cannabis is Weighing Heavily on Beer’s Buzz,” stating “In our initiation on the U.S. Cannabis industry, we asserted that increased use of cannabis presents a risk to alcohol, in particular distilled spirits (that over-index to men) and mainstream/economy beer. Data for Colorado (Denver only), Washington and Oregon support this conclusion.”

The Nielsen (liquor industry) report shows definitively that beer volumes in Denver have fallen specifically because of legal cannabis sales at all levels of the industry, and Cowen and Company’s research further states: “To be sure, admitted annual adult cannabis use of 14% falls well below the 70% that drink alcohol, and the 25% that smoke cigarettes. However, with the category having added at least 10 million consumers over the last 12 years, and with momentum building in terms of popular support and legislation, the cannabis industry is poised to generate meaningful growth. Over the last decade we have seen incidence climb for both alcohol and tobacco, across the total population, though alcohol looks to be under pressure.”

Alan Brochstein, chartered financial analyst from the investment research firm New Cannabis Ventures said, “My own view is that the legalization of cannabis for adults is a long-term issue for the alcohol industry as consumers are allowed to substitute one intoxicant for another. The impact will be slowed to a great degree by the lack of legal social use. This is why I am watching the developments in Denver so closely, as three years after legalization, one still can’t go to a restaurant or bar and enjoy cannabis publicly.”

It would appear that the liquor industry will be paying close attention to cannabis as an unwelcome competitor going forward.

While society should be celebrating the reduction in drunks on the street, fewer car accidents caused by intoxicated drivers, falling rates of domestic abuse and increased productivity due to fewer hung-over workers, it seems that those negative consequences of alcohol abuse must be tolerated as long as the investor class continues to line their pockets with liquor profits—unless, of course, they can co-opt the cannabis market and cash in on that as well.

You can keep up with all of HIGH TIMES’ marijuana news right here.

Photograph: Glenn Scott 

My name is Warren Bobrow.  I have a successful career as a brand ambassador for a boutique rum brand, so why would I go and write a book about Cannabis?  Quite possibly because no one has written a book like this prior. And I really enjoy Cannabis- perhaps even more than drinking- my career is in drinking, so go figure…
And because I was able to convince my publisher that drinking Cannabis is far preferable to smoking or eating it, we went ahead and published this brand new book.

My first book, Apothecary Cocktails offered my view of the type of ‘cocktails’ that may have been enjoyed in the early apothecary.
And in full disclosure, no!!! I’m not a doctor.  Nope. But what I am is a celebrated mixologist and former trained chef who is fascinated by flavor.

So indulge me for a moment while I let you know that Cannabis appeared in the early pharmacy, not as the much vilified Snake Oil- but- quite possibly the only ingredient that actually cured anything?  I’m not sure- because again, I’m not a doctor- I don’t even play one on television.  But I do know that Cannabis has been used in the healing arts for many thousands of years.  Way before this is your brain on drugs.  (I saw this commercial again the other night.. funny!)

I wrote Cannabis Cocktails to play with flavor.  It gives the whole bagel recipe.  You shall have the ability to decarb, to infuse and to create some pretty fun drinks.  Or if you don’t want to use alcohol with your Cannabis, there are some Mock-Tails, like my Vietnamese Iced Coffee with Cannabis Infused Condensed Milk… (the perfect medium is high fat condensed milk… try it!)

There are no edibles in the book.  And I will say this and say it again.  Know your raw ingredients.  Use tested Cannabis… Remember what you learned about eating spicy Thai food.  Start slow.  Don’t have more than one cocktail per hour or more!

I’ll be sharing with you some of my creations and hope you enjoy trying them.   Meanwhile, this is how you can order my book(s).

I can be reached on Twitter: @warrenbobrow1

Cannabis Cocktails… Available on Amazon!

The New Smoker says

Puff, Puff, Drink…

When getting intoxicated in only one way isn’t enough!

Sure you like to get high, and you like to get drunk. But if what you really want to do is get drunkly high or highly drunk with style, then the book Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics by perma-happy mixologist Warren Bobrow, is the book for you.

Warren Bobrow (Author)

Some say alcohol and cannabis don’t mix. Those people are just doing it wrong. Booze before Bud, head hits thud… but Bud before Booze is a breezy cruise. And Both blended together can be badass.

Bobrow’s book is a collection of 75 recipes of cannabis influenced cocktails and drinks designed to bring the buzz. But beyond cocktails, you can create special tonics, syrups, shrubs, bitters, compound butter and exotic infused oil to use in any drink, or to start your own Apothecary in the 1890s.

Begin your day with coffee, tea, and milk-based cannabis beverages to bring in a super Sunday hanging around the house listening to aaallll of Sting before heading to your local Broga class (Bro yoga: for dudes only). Or get an afternoon pick-me-up with gut healing shrubs and mood enhancing syrups before chowing down on Mickey D’s on your “cheat day” cuz the cravings are craaaazy today. Make cooling lemonades and sparking herbal infusions to soothe the fevered brow after that big fight with your boyfriend about who didn’t soak the dishes enough. Then have an after dinner herbal-based cannabis drink for relaxation at the end of a crazy high day cuz you didn’t realize you didn’t have to try all the recipes in one day. The options are intoxicatingly endless with Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics.

http://thenewsmoker.com/cannabis-cocktails-mocktails-tonics/

Gift Guide: 13 Great Cocktail, Spirits and Bartending Books from 2016

Books stacked on bookshelves

The cocktail book category seems to grow exponentially every year, and 2016 brought readers everything from bourbon to amaro to tiki. (Photo: David_Ahn via iStock)

Another year, another slew of smart, thought-provoking and entertaining cocktail books. Tomes about spirits, bar ownership, drinking cultures and more filled the shelves as bartenders and cocktail experts put pen to paper. The category of cocktail books is ever-growing, and this year brought readers everything from bourbon to amaro, from minimalist equal-parts drinks to over-the-top tiki builds, from drinking to your health (literally) to the goings-on behind the scenes of a World’s Best Bar.

Because we’re in peak gift-giving season, because a certain holiday is mere days away, and because books are equal parts thoughtful gift and handy last-minute solution for shopping procrastinators, here’s just a smattering of the titles published this year that any bartender would be lucky to sport on their shelf.

For Your Open-Minded Friend in California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Nevada, Massachusetts or Maine: “Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics” by Warren Bobrow

“It adds very green tasting notes and aromas, and I find that to be quite beguiling,” Warren Bobrow told us earlier this year. That “it” is referring to cannabis, which makes its way into cocktails in the form of tinctures and infusions dreamed up by Bobrow for his guide to more, ah, herbacious drinks, “Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics.” Though the concept of adding THC to alcohol has catalyzed some debate in the mixology community, Bobrow’s stance is more apothecarist than bong-ripping bro: he cites the historical precedent of cannabis-infused elixirs and views them more as a health tonic than a one-way ticket to outer space. Just use common sense: don’t try these at home if recreational marijuana’s illegal in your state, never experiment with these at a bar or other commercial establishment, and remember, if you go too far, a glass of lemonade with three to four black peppercorns will set you straight. According to Bobrow, at least.

For everyone on your list: “Regarding Cocktails” by Sasha Petraske with Georgette Moger-Petraske

Perhaps one of the most anticipated releases of 2016, this beautiful book is both tribute to and legacy of one of the world’s greatest bartenders, who passed away unexpectedly last year. Sasha Petraske’s subtle wit, revered wisdom and timeless recipes are preserved in these pages thanks to the efforts of his wife, spirits writer Georgette Moger-Petraske, who lovingly and generously worked to complete the book. From Milk and Honey devotees to young bartenders interested in gleaning the wisdom of a legend, this book will suit any reader interested in cocktail culture and the man who helped to catalyze it.

For the aspiring owner of the next World’s Best Bar: “The Canon Cocktail Book” by Jamie Boudreau

Jamie Boudreau’s drinks helped to solidify Canon’s status among the world’s best bars, so it’s no surprise that the recipes in this book would appeal to advanced cocktail connoisseurs. But where this tome really shines is through Boudreau’s own insights, observations and advice for opening a bar, keeping operations running smoothly and elevating every detail along the way. Expect a refreshingly honest take on what it really takes to run a world-class bar like Canon — and, of course, no shortage of equally world-class recipes.

For the Pappy hound: “Bourbon: The Rise, Fall and Rebirth of American Whiskey” by Fred Minnick

With the great bourbon revival, many lay claim to the title of expert. But few have chops quite like Fred Minnick’s. The whiskey historian has multiple titles under his belt already, including a history of women in whiskey and an interactive guide to tasting whiskey. His latest promises an in-depth, colorful retrospective of bourbon’s role in America, dispelling a few myths and uncovering some little-known truths along the way.

For the bartending minimalist: “Shake. Stir. Sip. More Than 50 Effortless Cocktails Made in Equal Parts” by Kara Newman

In a world of twelve-ingredient cocktails and sub-sub-sub recipes, Wine Enthusiast spirits editor Kara Newman’s take on drink recipes is a breath of fresh air. Each cocktail listed here is equal-parts, straightforward, quick to mix, and very, very difficult to mess up — making it a perfect fit not just for home bartenders, but also professional bartenders who just want a good drink without, you know, feeling like they’re at work.

For the aperitivo aficionado: “Spritz: Italy’s Most Iconic Aperitivo Cocktail, with Recipes” by Leslie Pariseau and Talia Baiocchi

This homage to Italy’s culture of low-ABV, easy drinking came from an editor at Saveur and the editor-in-chief of PUNCH, meaning it was destined from the start to be masterfully executed (and beautiful to look at). Leslie Pariseau and Talia Baiocchi combine a little history, a bit of travel and culture, and a slew of delicious recipes from bartenders around the world for their love letter to all things bubbly and refreshing. The rigorous research process involved the duo embarking on a road trip to seven different Italian cities to explore each community’s unique spritz culture, making the book just as much a wanderlust-inducing travelogue as it is a cocktail book.

For the Hawaiian Shirt-Wearing, Orgeat-Making, Rum-Swilling Tiki Fan: “Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki” by Martin Cate

The culture of tiki is so much more than syrupy sweet drinks, tiny umbrellas and vintage Hawaiian shirts. And few people understand this quite like Martin Cate, proprietor of San Francisco’s renowned Smuggler’s Cove and devoted student of the deep, rich history rooted in Polynesian pop culture. In Cate’s expansive book, he looks at the history of tiki and how it was revived, how bars and home aficionados can recreate the tiki experience on their own, how he built that experience at Smuggler’s Cove, and over 100 recipes from their award-winning bar program (plus a few new ones created specifically for this book).

For the Friend Who Hits the Bar on Their Way Home from Yoga: “Zen and Tonic” by Jules Aron and “The Thinking Girl’s Guide to Drinking” by Ariane Resnick and Brittani Rae

Can you live a healthy lifestyle and regularly enjoy a good drink at the same time? This year, a few books set out to prove that yes, you can.

Bartender-turned-author Jules Aron published “Zen and Tonic,” her guide to cocktails “for the enlightened drinker,” earlier this spring. The book sets out to bring readers back to the old-school philosophy of cocktail as conduit of the medicinal properties of plants, focusing on florals, herbs, fresh fruits and natural sugars. While we have a long way to go before a cocktail can truly be “guilt-free,” Aron imbues hers with healthy alternatives to mass-produced mixers and syrups — think kombucha concoctions, herbal tonics and fruits front and center, all with a nice kick of booze.

2015 Speed Rack champion Brittani Rae isn’t just formidably fast behind the stick; she’s also incredibly creative when it comes to cocktail creation. In “The Thinking Girl’s Guide to Drinking,” Rae teamed up with nutritionist and bestselling author Ariane Resnick to offer a comprehensive guide to home bartending that eschews artificial flavoring agents, high-sugar ingredients and other nasty add-ons. Instead, you’ll find drinks that use ingredients boasting antioxidants and other wellness benefits, from greens to coconut cream. For home bartenders, the book also includes a helpful crash-course on prep, glassware and techniques.

For the Embittered: “Amaro” by Brad Thomas Parsons

The follow-up to Parsons’ 2011 “Bitters” compendium, “Amaro” picks up the mantle and explores the production, categorization, and history of the storied bittersweet liqueur. (Complete with a slew of recipes, of course.) Parsons describes it as a companion piece to the James Beard Award-winning “Bitters,” and “a love letter to Italy filtered through my American point of view.” As bartenders continue exploring the category and more guests dip a toe in the waters, “Amaro” makes for essential reading for anyone on either side of the bar.

For the Bartender Who Rolls Her Eyes When Someone Calls a Drink ‘Girly’: “Drink Like a Woman: Shake, Stir, Conquer, Repeat” by Jeanette Hurt

The sexist history of bartending culture; the laughable concept of “manly” or “girly” drinks; the many powerful women making huge moves behind the bar — it’s all up for discussion in Jeanette Hurt’s girl power cocktail guide (plus, all the techniques, recipes and tips a home bartender might need to know). “Drink Like A Woman” features the life stories and recipes of feminist heroes, including noted bar matrons like Marcy Skowronksi, the feisty nonagenarian helming the bar at Milwaukee’s Holler House, and Ada Coleman, the first female celebrity mixologist who rose to fame at The Savoy around the turn of the 19th century (and invented the classic Hanky Panky).

For Your Cocky Young Barback Who’s Never Had to Make a Fuzzy Navel: “A Proper Drink: the Untold Story of How a Band of Bartenders Saved the Civilized Drinking World” by Robert Simonson

My, how far we’ve come. In the past two decades, cocktail culture has evolved by leaps and bounds thanks to the grit, determination, and good taste of a select few pioneers who endeavored to resurrect the classics and bring us back to a more thoughtful way of drinking. That’s the story as told by Robert Simonson, the New York Times drinks writer who profiles the hard-won gains made in the cocktail world over the last two decades, and the people we have to thank for them. Buy a copy for yourself to remember your roots; give another copy to a young whippersnapper who’s never used prepackaged sour mix and deserves to understand why.

For the Lovable Dingus in Your Life: “Cocktails for Ding Dongs” by Dustin Drankiewicz

Why so serious, cocktail books? In a time of leather-bound tomes espousing complex recipes and in-depth treatises on single spirits, it’s refreshing to see one take a lighter approach. With its doodle-esque line drawings and goofy title, “Cocktails for Ding Dongs” may look and sound like pure whimsy. But with know-how from Chicago bartender Dustin Drankiewicz, the book is actually packed with practical insight and solid recipes for classics, drinks resurrected from the “tini days,” and boozy drinks with aged spirits, all supplemented with hilarious illustrations. (Adjacent to the Lemon Drop recipe, two organic lemons watch from a farmstand as a third lemon jauntily struts by. “He’s just cocky because he’s going to The Aviary,” says one.)

https://talesofthecocktail.com/products/13-great-cocktail-spirits-and-bartending-books-2016?utm_source=Online+Subscribers&utm_campaign=2aab944acd-Tuesday+-+December+20&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_2c672a26a8-2aab944acd-97215241

All the Cocktails and Spirits Books Published in 2016 for Reading or Gifting

I am honored to be included with these wonderful authors.

Whiskey Books

Bourbon: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of an American Whiskey by Fred Minnick

More Kentucky Bourbon Cocktails by Joy Perrine and Susan Reigler

The Big Man of Jim Beam: Booker Noe And the Number-One Bourbon In the World by Jim Kokoris

Whisky Japan: The Essential Guide to the World’s Most Exotic Whisky by Dominic Roskrow

Iconic Whisky: Tasting Notes & Flavour Charts for 1,500 of the World’s Best Whiskies by Cyrille Mald and Alexandre Vingtier

Whiskey: A Spirited Story with 75 Classic and Original Cocktails by Michael Dietsch

The Manhattan: The Story of the First Modern Cocktail with Recipes by Philip Greene

Miscellany 

Made of Iceland: A Drink & Draw Book  by Reyka Vodka, Snorri Sturluson

Inside The Bottle: People, Brands, and Stories  by Arthur Shapiro

The Craft Cocktail Coloring Book by Prof Johnny Plastini

Drinking with Republicans and Drinking with Democrats by Mark Will-Weber

The Moonshine Wars by Daniel Micko

Drinks: A User’s Guide by Adam McDowell

Shrubs: An Old-Fashioned Drink for Modern Times (Second Edition) by Michael Dietsch

A Proper Drink: The Untold Story of How a Band of Bartenders Saved the Civilized Drinking World by Robert Simonson

Colonial Spirits: A Toast to Our Drunken History by Steven Grasse

DIY Bitters: Reviving the Forgotten Flavor – A Guide to Making Your Own Bitters for Bartenders, Cocktail Enthusiasts, Herbalists, and More by Jovial King and Guido Mase

Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas by Brad Thomas Parsons

Drink Like A Grown-Up by The League of Extraordinary Drinkers

The Coming of Southern Prohibition: The Dispensary System and the Battle over Liquor in South Carolina, 1907-1915 by Michael Lewis

American Wino: A Tale of Reds, Whites, and One Man’s Blues by Dan Dunn

Distilled Stories: California Artisans Behind the Spirits by Capra Press

Building Bacardi: Architecture, Art & Identity by Allan T. Shulman

Craft Spirits by Eric Grossman

Cocktail Books, General

Cocktails for Ding Dongs by Dustin Drankiewicz (Author), Alexandra Ensign (Illustrator)

Zen and Tonic: Savory and Fresh Cocktails for the Enlightened Drinker by Jules Aron

Pretty Fly For a Mai Tai: Cocktails with rock ‘n’ roll spirit

Cocktails for Drinkers: Not-Even-Remotely-Artisanal, Three-Ingredient-or-Less Cocktails that Get to the Point  by Jennifer McCartney

Aperitivo: The Cocktail Culture of Italy by Marisa Huff

The Complete Cocktail Manual: 285 Tips, Tricks, and Recipes by Lou Bustamante and the United States Bartenders’ Guild

Shake. Stir. Sip.: More than 50 Effortless Cocktails Made in Equal Parts by Kara Newman

101 Cocktails to Try Before you Die  by Francois Monti

Drink Like a Man: The Only Cocktail Guide Anyone Really Needs by Ross McCammon and David Wondrich

The New Cocktail Hour: The Essential Guide to Hand-Crafted Cocktails by Andre Darlington and Tenaya Darlington

Spritz: Italy’s Most Iconic Aperitivo Cocktail, with Recipes by Talia Baiocchi and Leslie Pariseau

Eat Your Drink: Culinary Cocktails by Matthew Biancaniello

Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails & Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations by Warren Bobrow

Tiki with a Twist: 75 Cool, Fresh, and Wild Tropical Cocktails by Lynn Calvo and James O. Fraioli

Cocktail Books from Bars or Places

The Canon Cocktail Book: Recipes from the Award-Winning Bar by Jamie Boudreau  and James O. Fraioli

Regarding Cocktails by Sasha Petraske and Georgette Moger-Petraske

Brooklyn Spirits: Craft Distilling and Cocktails from the World’s Hippest Borough By Peter Thomas Fornatale and Chris Wertz

Smuggler’s Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki by Martin Cate and Rebecca Cate

Cuban Cocktails: Over 50 mojitos, daiquiris and other refreshers from Havana

Brooklyn Bar Bites: Great Dishes and Cocktails from New York’s Food Mecca by Barbara Scott-Goodman

The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book by Frank Caiafa

Lift Your Spirits: A Celebratory History of Cocktail Culture in New Orleans by Elizabeth M. Williams and Chris McMillian

Science!

Shots of Knowledge: The Science of Whiskey by Rob Arnold and Eric Simanek

Distilled Knowledge: The Science Behind Drinking’s Greatest Myths, Legends, and Unanswered Questions  by Brian D Hoefling

Classic Cocktail Book Reprints

THE HOME BARTENDER’S GUIDE AND SONG BOOK {By Charlie Roe and Jim Schwenck}

AMERICAN BAR {By Frank P. Newman}

LOUIS’ MIXED DRINKS {By Louis Muckenstrum}

Beer (A few beer books slip through the cracks and come to me)

The United States of Beer: A Freewheeling History of the All-American Drink by Dane Huckelbridge

The Beer Geek Handbook: Living a Life Ruled by Beer by Patrick Dawson

 

http://www.alcademics.com/2016/12/all-the-cocktails-and-spirits-books-published-in-2016-for-reading-or-gifting.html#tpe-action-posted-6a00e553b3da20883401b7c8bd90bf970b

STROHVER ACHIEVER COCKTAIL

STROHVER ACHIEVER COCKTAIL

by Warren Bobrow

Ingredients
1 oz. STROH 80 (STROH 160 PROOF)
1 oz. Pickett’s Ginger Beer Syrup
4 oz. Plain Seltzer
2 drops Bitter Truth Chocolate Bitters
2 drops Bitter End Jamaican Jerk Bitters
2 drops Fee Brothers Chocolate Bitters
garnish of orange zest

Preparation
In a Mixing glass filled 3/4 with ice
Add the STROH 80 (STROH 160 PROOF)
Add the Ginger Syrup
Stir to combine
Strain into a Burgundy Glass with a few large cubes of hand-cut ice
Add the Seltzer
Add the bitters
Twist the orange zest over the top
Serve!

8 Great Gifts For Your Best Buds- #4!

All through the year, they were there to pack you a bowl when you needed them most. So, now that this season of generosity has rolled around, show your best pothead pals how much they mean to you with these gifts designed to put the merry in marijuana!

1. AnnaBís Purse

1. AnnaBís Purse

An AnnaBis bag is the ultimate in elegance for the sleek and stylish stoner gal in your life. The up-and-coming brand’s newest line takes inspiration from some of pop culture’s most beloved cannabis queens, and earns its laurels with stunning design and fabrication. As always, AnnaBis purses prove that dank and discreet don’t have to be mutually exclusive, stowing your stash and its scent safely away.

2. KushKards

2. KushKards

This holiday season, give a greeting that’s higher than Hallmark, and say it with a Kush Kard! They contain what every festive friend wants — wit and weed! You just slip in a joint rolled with your special someone’s preferred strain, and voila! Holiday cheer is as good as guaranteed. It’s the perfect present for any cannabis enthusiast!

3. Coaching Session with Molly

3. Coaching Session with Molly

Everyone has that one stellar stoner friend who is astoundingly still single despite being basically the best. This year, why don’t you gift that good catch a coaching package with Molly Peckler of Highly Devoted? Molly knows that cannabis comes into play with compatibility, and gives the dankest dating advice to help potheads find the partners they desire and deserve! Get a free consult just for filling out the form on her site.

4. Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics by Warren Bobrow.

4. Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics by Warren Bobrow.

Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails and Tonics by Warren Bobrow is a great gift for any aspiring ganja gourmand! Whether your friend is new to bartending or a seasoned expert, the marijuana infusions in this must-have volume are sure to take their mixological adventures to new heights! You never know, you might even end up reaping the benefits of these irresistible recipes yourself!

5. Binske Chocolate

5. Binske Chocolate

If you think an ethical edible would be just the right thing to show your friend you care, well, it doesn’t get any better than Binske. These chocolate champions are fair to their farmers, kind to the community, and provide a product that tastes like a little piece of pot-infused heaven. They’re available now in Colorado, but look out for their fruit leathers coming soon, as well!

6. City Sessions Denver Tour

6. City Sessions Denver Tour

Maybe this year you want to skip the stuff and give the gift of experience. In that case, the City Sessions Denver tour is our top suggestion! If you know a smart stoner who seems curious about the story behind their bud, you can give them this awesome opportunity to tour an extraction lab or grow house and learn a lot about pot. Tag along with them, and you’re sure to make meaningful memories!

7. Hmbldt vape pen

7. Hmbldt vape pen

7. A Hmbldt vape pen is the perfect present for your health-conscious loved one who isn’t necessarily looking to get high. A dose from this delightful vape pen offers all of the sense-soothing benefits of bud without the cognitive effects that can sometimes come with cannabis. Time Magazine even called the device one of the 25 Best Inventions of 2016, suggesting that cannabis could replace both over-the-counter and prescription medication for some.

8. Custom 24K Gold Joint

LA’s most discerning cannabis connoisseurs (with the necessary medical credentials) know that Rose Collective rolls the classiest jays. So, the next time you’re in need of a host present for a holiday soiree, why don’t you skip the obligatory bottle of wine and go for one of their famed 24-karat gold leaf custom rolls? Select a strain that suits the mood of the event, and spread the joy of the season to all of your fellow revelers. You can even add to the effect by slipping it in a Kush Kard for safekeeping!

https://www.buzzfeed.com/goldcat88/8-great-gifts-for-your-best-buds-2ptm2?utm_term=.ffjlNe0xXW#.qn06KaqK