About Warren_Bobrow

Author of: Apothecary Cocktails-Restorative Drinks from Yesterday and Today- Bitters and Shrub Syrup Cocktails: Restorative Vintage Cocktails, Mocktails, and Elixirs - Whiskey Cocktails : Rediscovered Classics and Contemporary Craft Drinks Using the World's Most Popular Spirit - Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. Apothecary Cocktails was nominated for a Spirited Award at the 2014 Tales of the Cocktail.... Warren writes about food, wine, mixology and spirits. He is a master mixologist for several craft liquor companies. Warren is a former chef/saucier- fresh pasta manufacturing company owner *lost business in Hurricane Hugo* - to private banking (for 20 years, a grand mistake) to reinvention as the Warren he's always wanted to become.

Tasting and Book Signing in Stone Ridge NY!

Please join my friend Brendan Edwards and myself for a tasting and book signing, Saturday August 26, 2017 from 2 – 7 pm  at Stone Ridge Wine & Spirits Inc  3853 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 12484

I’ll be conjuring up a lovely cocktail called “You’re Talking About Memories” with Royal Rose Simple Syrup of Saffron and Mezcal ~  Shaken, of course.

Brendan will have Mezcales De Leyenda Organic Mezcals and Tanteo Infused Tequilas – Jalapeño and Chipotle!

Cocktails, neat, education and an all around excellent, Agave filled Saturday afternoon!

For more information, go to:

http://www.mezcalesdeleyenda.com/

https://www.tanteotequila.com/

https://www.facebook.com/events/119849275333021/?ti=cl

 

Tropical Sugar Cane Cannabis Cocktail

Take this tropical sugar-cane mocktail to a ‘higher’ level  – Cannabis recipe

 

Vietnamese sugar-cane juice with cannabis-infused milk is the perfect elixir for a gloomy day.

 

I’m a huge fan of hot-weather beverages. Right now, it’s anything but hot out, but this little mocktail will transport you. This time of year can be warm and sunny, or it can be thanklessly cold and rainy. It may officially be spring, but we are experiencing the occasional icy wind that goes right through you. That’s where Vietnamese-style, freshly crushed sugar-cane juice comes in. This scintillating liquid — extracted from the stalk using a machine that resembles a sausage grinder — is refreshing, and come summer, it’ll stave off the heat and humidity with alacrity.  To take my iced sugar-cane juice to a higher level (so to speak), I use condensed milk for the infusion. The condensed milk takes to decarbed cannabis beautifully, and you can use it in a plethora of concoctions — from the obvious caramel, by cooking it very low and slow until it caramelizes, or as the aide-de-camp to a Vietnamese iced sugar-cane juice, which is the topic of this article.

READ MORE AT: http://www.seattletimes.com/life/take-this-tropical-sugar-cane-mocktail-to-a-higher-level-cannabis-recipe/

Partition Street Wine Shop

 

Punch For The Late Summer Season

Punch is an easy way to show your appreciation to your guests and what better way than with the brightest and freshest of fruits of the season?

Warren Bobrow late summer punch

May I suggest first empowering your bar-backs. What? Aren’t they more concerned with making your fresh juices and polishing the glassware? Well, they should be doing that- and then some. When you truly want to raise the bar, and promote from the bottom up, the best way that I know how to find talented future bartenders is through the art of a late summer punch. 

It takes an understanding of the classics, starting with Jerry Thomas. Mr. Thomas for all intents and purposes is our inspiration for what we consider the classic cocktails. He was plying his craft a hundred or more years before you disappointed your grandparents by pitching that law degree in favor of slinging Ramos Gin Fizzes to thirsty hordes of newly minted revelers. 

Jerry Thomas wrote the famous book named the Bartenders Guide (also known as “how to mix drinks” and sometimes known as: The Bon-Vivant’s Companion).  His work is as relevant today as it was in the 1840’s and maybe even more so now- with the rediscovery of classic cocktails and nostalgic methodology.  But I’m getting ahead of myself.  I think the first thing a bar owner or restaurant owner should do is get a copy of “how to mix drinks” and start working out of it. 

 I think a good place to start is by explaining what a wise bartender named Chris James once taught me.  He said don’t throw it out. Don’t throw what out? The last ¼ inch of a bottle. Work with flavors- save it for punch- it’s liquid money and it doesn’t go down the drain. I never forgot this lesson- just like I never forgot the lessons that I learned when I worked as a cook.  There are things that we can do to save the house money, and other things that will get us fired.  I’d rather keep my job and make money for the house than have to search for another one because I was foolish and poured ‘that’ bottle down the drain.  Save it for Punch!

Jerry Thomas Brandy Punch

As interpreted by myself with seasonal embellishments… like Cognac over plain brandy and the use of Champagne instead of plain water.

Warren Bobrow late summer punch

Ingredients

  • 1-750ml bottle of Champagne   
  • 1-750ml bottle Camus XO
    Cognac
  • 375ml Jamaican Rum- find a natural one without added sugar or caramel color 
  • 2 cups Double Simple Syrup (2:1 Turbanado Sugar to boiling water) 
  • 10 oz. freshly squeezed lemon juice 
  • 4 oz. Grand Marnier or Cointreau
  • 3 oz. Grenadine 
  • Whole pineapple sliced and grilled until nicely caramelized 
  • 2 oranges sliced into rounds and grilled 
  • 1 package of organic raspberries

Prep:

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a large punch bowl
  2. Add a block of ice to dilute and add coolness to the punch
  3. Serve in tea cups with a smile

 

Another great Professor Jerry Thomas drink is known simply as the Gin Punch.  I think it’s a must do in your repertoire because gin is a very popular drink- there always is some left to use in punch.  Quite refreshing and thirst quenching during the hot months in the late Summer. 

Classic Gin Punch- influenced by Professor Jerry Thomas Gin Punch

Ingredients:

  • 1-750 ml bottle of Barr Hill “Tom Cat” Gin (distilled by hand from Raw Honey and local grain and aged in a whiskey cask) 
  • 375ml Champagne
  • 1 cup raspberries- pureed
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice- un-strained but seeded
  • 1-12 oz. bottle of cane sugar based Ginger Beer (like Q-Ginger Beer)

Prep:

  1. Shake with a Boston Shaker until frothy and serve with about a cup of fresh raspberries and orange/lemon pinwheels
  2. Serve in a large punch bowl with plenty of ice

 

The final cocktail of this series is made with a combination of rum and rye whiskey.  I’ve chosen to use the magnificently made Barrell Rye Whiskey #001 and their equally salubrious Whiskey Barrel aged Jamaican Rum.  Pretty amazing stuff together, the interplay of wood against smoke and char surrounding the dry coffee tinged sweetness of the rye whiskey. 

Rum and Whiskey Punch

Ingredients:

  • 1 750ml Bottle Barrell Rye Whiskey
  • ½ 750ml Bottle Barrell Rum (Jamaica)
  • 1 cup Double Simple Syrup (as above)
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  • Crushed Ice
  • Grilled Orange Pinwheels

Prep:

  1. Fill Glasses with the Crushed Ice to cool
  2. Into a cocktail mixing glass, fill ¾ with bar ice
  3. Add the liquid ingredients
  4. Stir, stir, stir
  5. Strain over freshly crushed ice in the glasses and garnish with grilled orange pinwheels

5 Superb And Refreshing Summer Drinks Containing Grapefruit

5 Superb And Refreshing Summer Drinks Containing Grapefruit

And as an extra bonus, cannabis!

refreshing

Photo by Flickr user Wine Dharma

When the temperature rises above 90 degrees for what seems like days on end. When the swamp that is slowly running down your back makes a beeline for your brow- burning on the way down… you know that it is time for a refreshing little cocktail. One that smacks of tart and slightly acerbic flavor- a touch of smoke- a hint of sweet- the peel of citrus, the oil of grapefruit. I think I known what I love to drink is none other than the Hemingway Daiquiri. Here are five riffs on the classic Hemingway mind eraser. Two have medical grade Cannabis in the mix- I’ll suggest the strains too.

Decarbing is essential to my method of making cocktails that have the good stuff in them. THC. I don’t work with CBD, so please- don’t ask. I know nothing of it- and quite frankly think most of it is a shameless money grab. Hemp is rope, building materials, cosmetics- not carefully crafted cocktails made with non-commercial spirits. I’ve been pretty clear on this one from day one. I suggest looking at that snake-oil (CBD) being dripped into your gin and tonic then ask what exactly is this going to do? Absolutely nothing- because the product has nothing psycho-active in it. My late step-father was always dismayed when he couldn’t buy Hemp lines for his yacht. He’d say- cut a piece and smoke it.

Best Bitters

Healers and Tipplers-
Bitters from the past and the present.

During the 1800’s immigrants came to the New World from far off lands. Some of these early settlers brought their primitive methods of healing with them in the form of root teas, bitters, tonics and elixirs. Root teas were already well established for healing from the Native Americans who lived in the New World and they taught the immigrants methods of healing, some of which still exist today.

Bitters are powerfully concentrated forms of herbal healing that date back to the dawn of man. They are still used for ailments that range from stomach disorders to the healing of circulatory systems in the body. Bitters also have a secondary purpose. Not only do they have medicinal purposes but their bitter flavor and concentrated aromatics that just happen to be delicious in cocktails.

Antique Peychaud Postcard
It’s pretty well established that bitters have been used in the cocktail arts since Antoine Amédée Peychaud created his namesake bitters in the earliest concoctions that evolved into our modern day cocktails.

Peychaud’s Bitters were originally created to stave off dysentery and other debilitating afflictions of the digestive tract. Please remember that during the mid 1800’s, refrigeration and good sanitary practices were all but unknown so the use of bitters in healing was not just a trend, they were absolutely necessary!

Some of the oldest brands are still used today like Peychaud’s Aromatic Bitters. Indispensible in cocktails like the Sazerac, Peychaud’s distinctively red color seems to signify strength and power over illnesses of the belly. Angostura Bitters an equally venerable brand was also originally formulated to be effective for afflictions of the digestive tract. Angostura was invented by Dr. Johann Gottlieb Benjamin Siegert, a German doctor in the mid 1800’s, for use in curing stomach disorders. Tropical temperatures were not conducive for the preservation of food thus stomach ailments were prevalent during this pre-electricity period. Bitters such as Angostura and Peychaud’s, although still in use today in the concoction of cocktails, are rarely used for their original purpose. But if you have a hangover or a stomach ache there are scarcely any non-medicinal products available on the market today that work as effectively without synthetically produced, chemical ingredients.

 

Mixing cocktails with bitters

 

The craft cocktail explosion in recent years has given creative mixologists and ardent cocktail enthusiasts the opportunity to introduce concentrated herbal and fruit driven flavors to their cocktails. But many modern day bartenders and mixologists may not be aware of the rich history of bitters. For both Classic Cocktails and the newer versions of the classics, bitters are a thing of the past in a very modern context. The original bitters developers in Sweden, France and Germany would scarcely have imagined the direction that the cocktail industry has taken towards flavor driven augmentations. What we have now in the cocktail world are creative mixologists unleashing flavor combinations that evoke the past, and through this past we have the present.

Today’s Cocktail and Speakeasy bars will have dozens of bitters on hand. Their purpose is to add an element of surprise– to unlock a secret only known to flavor. That is what high end drinking is all about. And the quality of your bitters are as important as the syrups, juices, tonics and liquors.

If you are thinking of opening a bottle of tonic water you should try Q-Tonic or perhaps some Fever Tree Tonic. I’m inclined to mix some Tomr’s Tonic or maybe some Jack Rudy with either Perrier Sparkling Natural Mineral Water or Polar Sparkling Water.

The thoughts of bitter and sweet in a mixed drink acts like a metaphor for life itself. Bitters are not just for stomach aches any longer!

Here is a list of the best bitters that are available today:

 

Angostura- 
The venerable Angostura Bitters is not only for healing the stomach, but it’s also gorgeous in a drink known simply as the Pink Gin. Just a few drops of Angostura Bitters in a cupful of gin will administer great healing!
Peychaud’s Bitters-
The modern uses of Peychaud’s Bitters are not so far from the original uses, in the cocktail still known today as the Sazerac.
The Bitter Truth-
From Germany, made with concentrated flavors that evoke fruits, herbs and spices. The name says it all!
Bittermens-
Produced by hand, these bitters are created to add new dimensions to mixed drinks.
Bitter End-
Decidedly antagonistic bitters for the most fevered dreams you can imagine. With bitters like Thai, Moroccan, Mexican Mole, Jamaican Jerk, Curry, Chesapeake Bay and Memphis Barbecue, these flavors are not for the meek. They shout, no, they scream in ancient languages not yet discovered. Their flavors exploit the fearful and reward the fearless. A mere drop of the Curry Bitters in a gin and tonic will take the drinker down the steamy path to a crocodile infested swamp. Someplace where the mosquitoes grow larger than your fist and your sunburned flesh is on the menu as the chef’s special of the day. Curry is a favored ingredient to cool the body. The turmeric element is a powerful curative against all forms of malaise. And the brooding alcohol level of Bitter End Bitters teaches us that all is not what it seems. Watch out for the Curry. They will pitch you over the edge if you’re not careful.
Bittered Sling-
is an uncommon name for a most profoundly concentrated and friendly spirit augmentation from one of my favorite places on the globe, Vancouver, BC. And the owners are really cool too.
Bittercube Bitters-
are aromatic and potent. Their Vanilla Bark is marvelous in a rum punch and the Bolivar Bitters unlock long gone spirits and bring flavor right into the present tense.
Bitters, Old Men-
There are over a dozen concentrated bitters from this Brooklyn based bitters alchemist. With flavors like Smoke Gets in your Bitters and Krangostura, an aromatic bitters befitting Krang, the villainous anthropomorphic brain from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, these are not your grandmom’s bitters for healing a cold.
Fee Brothers-
The venerable brand from New York State is just about the most historic brand on the market aside from Angostura and Peychaud’s. Recently the brand has branched out from the simply ravishing Whiskey Barrel Bitters to the aromatic and beguiling Cranberry Bitters along with their perennial favorites like Mint, West Indian Orange, Grapefruit and Celery.
Dale DeGroff’s Pimento-
is a lush, aromatic and deeply sensual bitter from cocktail master, Dale DeGroff and Jade Alchemist Ted Breaux. This is not the typical “sock in the mouth” version of the spicy pimento, but a deeply layered experience that includes Caribbean spices, anise and aromatic healing herbs.
Dram Bitters-
from Colorado are an apothecary lesson in each sip. They use aromatics like the other bitters on the market, yet take a devilish turn towards traditional ingredients such as chamomile, long known for restorative and healing elements.
Dr. Adam Elmegirab-
The bluntly talented bitters manufacturer produces historically correct versions of bitters such as the Teapot Bitters and the luscious Boker’s Bitters.
Scrappy’s Bitters-
makes a Chocolate Bitters that approaches otherworldly amongst other pure and concentrated flavors.
AZ Bitters Lab-
Lush and pure with concentrated flavors gathered from ingredients including exotic Mexican chocolate and sumptuous orange peels. My favorite in iced tea (with bourbon) is the Mexican Mole bitters!
Regan’s Orange Bitters No. 6-
Citrus flavors mesh beautifully with brown liquors and white (clear) liquors. They add spark and an edge to a mixed drink. Woven with Asian spices, this hearty reminder of pre-prohibition cocktailian pleasures gives depth and a crisp sense of purity to many different types of mixed drinks. What is not said about bitters on the label may well be the most important of all. They are good for you! Originally bitters were used as powerful healing for all sorts of ailments from the digestive tract to general malaise. These are the hidden pleasures of bitters. If you have a bellyache, try adding about five splashes of Regan’s Orange Bitters to a glass of seltzer water, drink it down and then repeat after an hour or so. I think you will find your breath refreshed and your stomach calmed.
Basement Bitters-
From the Tuthilltown Distillery in Gardiner, upstate New York, these bitters offer a slightly different approach to the creation of the typical cocktail bitters. The reworked recipe includes, rye whiskey, herbs, spices and maple syrup. These bitters are not your typical cocktail augmentation, but ones that offer a deeper and more concise trip into the darker side of a cocktail. They allow the drinker to find hidden meaning in every sip. The maple syrup is a favored ingredient in Minetta Tavern’s Maple Syrup Sazerac. This new classic cocktail based on the traditional Sazerac has the addition of a richly textured maple syrup in the mix of rye whiskey and absinthe. Basement Bitters have harnessed the maple syrup component in their sharply delineated bitters. A hit of sarsaparilla adds a perfect counterpoint to the sweetness of the maple. These are thirst-slaking bitters that are absolutely at home in a mixture of brown liquor and sweet vermouth. Or they may be enjoyed simply in a glass of seltzer water with a peel of citrus.
Hella Bitter-
from Brooklyn, NY is a crisp reminder that all in bitters are not the same. First of all the name is different than others on the market. They call the bitters Hella Bitter, offering “complexity and depth” to a drink. I see it very much the same way being a former cook. The world of Hella Bitter is a very familiar place in my life of harnessing flavor. The name is also different. Bitter not Bitters. I love the way the Hella Aromatic Bitter perks up a rum punch, or perhaps the citrus bitter in a very twisted drink with botanical gin as the primary intoxicant. Hella is about to shake up your palate, so make sure you bring an open mind to the bar.
Fernet-Branca-
Known as “bitter liquor”, is especially helpful when trying to vanquish a hangover or after a filling meal. It is also the ingredient in cocktails that adds depth and balance. The herbs and spices give great potency and balance to a number of cocktail experimentations. Personally speaking, I enjoy Fernet-Branca in a Rum and Coke. Other times Fernet-Branca is delicious with seltzer water and a pinwheel of lime as a powerful curative for what ails you. A couple drops in a Bloody Mary, for example, acts with as much intensity as a few drops of Angostura Bitters.

 

http://www.thefiftybest.com/cocktails/best_bitters/

A Successful Tale

A Successful Tale 
We’re back from Tales of the Cocktail and we wanted to share with you photos from the event. Enjoy!

‘Meet the Distillers Happy Hour’  With Warren Bobrow mixing up the drinks, and our very own Draga Culic, helping pour — the guests were in for a treat this year.On Thursday, July 20th at the Sheraton Hotel in New Orleans, the event circulated over 300 thirsty guests including mixologists, trade, media and distributors. We served three simple, but delicious cocktails. Our star cocktail of the evening, Pink Grazz, with Ramazzotti Apertivo Rosato with fruitations pink grapefruit, a splash of seltzer, topped with a grapefruit slice. The second cocktail, a Ramule, with Ramazzotti Amaro, ginger beer, topped with an orange slice. Lastly, our Mexicotti City, with Ramazzotti Sambuca and Mexican coke.

All in all, the event was a great success!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Meet the Distillers Happy Hour”
With Warren Bobrow mixing up the drinks, and our very own Draga Culic, helping pour — the guests were in for a treat this year.

On Thursday, July 20th at the Sheraton Hotel in New Orleans, the event circulated over 300 thirsty guests including mixologists, trade, media and distributors. We served three simple, but delicious cocktails. Our star cocktail of the evening, Pink Grazz, with Ramazzotti Apertivo Rosato with fruitations pink grapefruit, a splash of seltzer, topped with a grapefruit slice. The second cocktail, a Ramule, with Ramazzotti Amaro, ginger beer, topped with an orange slice. Lastly, our Mexicotti City, with Ramazzotti Sambuca and Mexican coke.

All in all, the event was a great success!